Futuristic Homes are a mixture of nostalgia for the natural and technological marvel. Sometimes the structures seem to emerge from a sci-fi comic book or a post-apocalyptic film, somewhere out of the distant future or past. Futurism emerged in the early-20th century in Italy. 

Since its first manifestation, the futuristic movement has embraced technological, historical, and social shifts. This evolutionary process has led to various subcategories, like googie, neo-futuristic, and contemporary futuristic architecture grounded in the parametric and eco-friendly design. The complex nature of futurism best becomes visible in housing projects, where the uncanny strongly contradicts the familiarity of living space. 

Let’s take a closer look at 40 back to the future homes around the world. 

1. Pigna Tree  Houses 

Pigna Tree Houses 
Tree House ©DomusGaia

The project was developed by architect Beltrame Claudio for a competition in 2014 and completed a couple of years later. The two cabins are located in the Italian Alps near Tarvisio. The residences are shelters for humans but also independent natural objects in the  environment, which imitate the characteristics of their surroundings.

2. Tree-ness House 

Tree-ness House 2
Tree-ness House ©Vincent Hecht

Tree-ness House is a  mixed-use building complex with apartments and galleries in Tokyo, Toshimaku. The project is designed by Japanese architect Akihisa Hirata. The building reintroduces the idea of organic architecture in the city context with modern materials. 

3. Wohnhaus F

Wohnhaus F
Wohnhaus F at night ©Meixner Schlüter Wendt Architects

Wohnhaus F is a private house built between 2003-2008 in Frankfurt, Germany by Meixner Schlüter Wendt Architects. As the architectural team explains “the starting point was to enhance the quality of the space and link the topography of the idyllic fruit meadow with the rooms in the house. 

The associative form created assumes the house is perceived in two ways: Either as a dynamic, floating vehicle qua flying object or as a normal gabled house on a slope from which the substance of the garden level has been elided.“

4. Traumhaus 

Traumhaus 
Traumhaus Fassade ©Markus Aumüller

Traumhaus, which literally means Dreamhouse, was designed by Erich Vogel and built in 2007 by Markus Aumüller in Oberursel, Germany. The project is an examination of form plasticity. 

5. Reflection of Mineral

Reflection of Mineral
Reflection of Mineral in the surroundings ©ignant architecture

Japanese architectural practice Atelier Tekuto designed an angular and futuristic home in central Tokyo. The project was completed in 2006. The architects explain that “the style of the house is a motif for the image of real ‘minerals’ that are buried underground. It portraits an attempt to magnify the volume within the building restrictions in Japan.”

6. Skew House

Skew House - Sheet1
Skew House Exterior ©October/Ueda and Nakagawa Architects
Skew House - Sheet2
Skew House Interior ©October/Ueda and Nakagawa Architects

Skew House is a private residency in Toride-city, Ibaraki, designed between 2005-2007 by October/Ueda and Nakagawa Architects. The interiors are strikingly minimalistic. As the architects say, “the unfamiliar appearance of the SKEW is of the very natural approach to physical conditions of the site and economical condition of usual budget“. 

7. Capital Hill Luxury Villa

Capital Hill Luxury Villa
Capital Hill Luxury Villa ©OKO Group

The villa was built in 2006 by Zaha Hadid Architects in Barvikha, Russia for the Russian businessman Vladislav Doronin. The house is located on the north-facing hillside, where the trees grow up to 30 meters. The form of the building is defined by this topography embracing the fluid geometries. 

8. Dupli Casa 

Dupli Casa
Dupli Casa ©J. MAYER H. ARCHITECTURE DESIGN RESEARCH

The double house located near Ludwigsburg, Germany was designed by the German Architect J.Mayer H. According to the architect, “the geometry is based on the footprint of the house that previously was located on the site, originally built in 1984 and with many extensions and modifications since then. The new building echoes the “family archeology” by duplication and rotation.”

9. Ols House

Ols House
Ols House ©David Frank

Ols House is located on a hillside near Stuttgart, with a generous view of the valley. The project also designed by J. Mayer H. Architects was completed in 2011. 

10. House in the Orchard

House in the Orchard
House in the Orchard ©Tomáš Malý

The housing project designed by architecture Studio Šepka Architekti is located in Prague and was completed in 2016. As the architects state: “The proposed construction of a family house endeavors through its small size and character to integrate itself among these trees.“

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Evgenia Asimakopoulou
Author

Evgenia is a young architect interested in interdisciplinary urban projects. She believes that the urban environment defines social relations and that people should actively claim the right to the city. Her interests embrace mapping and cinematic spaces. Besides architecture, she loves illustrations, fables, and science fiction.

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