Melbourne, a city filled with passion and culture. The city is filled with a variety of architectural styles. It is known for its diversity, excellent dining, education, and outstanding infrastructure. The best time to visit Melbourne will be from March to May and September to November. Also during the month of October to December, you can view the Seal Rocks which marks Melbourne as a great place to watch the wildlife. You can spot fresh vibrant live music too.

When you are planning to visit Melbourne, below are 15 places you must visit to understand how architecture, culture, innovation comes together.

1. In Absence Pavilion

Architect: Edition Office and Yhonnie Scarce

In Absence pavilion is a representation of how architecture can be interwoven with culture and history. The two separate standing structures in the context of the garden create a tangible existence between the gardens. The center void leads to a recollection of the culture in Australia. The use of black stained timber boards was to create a physical manifestation between the pavilion and the site.

In Absence Pavilion - Sheet1
In Absence Pavilion ©Ben Hosking
In Absence Pavilion - Sheet2
In Absence Pavilion ©Ben Hosking
In Absence Pavilion - Sheet3
In Absence Pavilion ©Ben Hosking

2.  The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub

Architect: Denton Corker Marshall

The architects required to build an innovative science and technology center that will be able to support the students in the future. The curved building stands for its unique sculptural structure which allows flexibility, transparency, and efficiency in the institution. As a reflection of the brief, the building creates a supportive environment for the students to enhance their creativity, knowledge, and social interaction.

The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub - Sheet1
The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub © John Gollings
The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub - Sheet2
The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub © John Gollings
The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub - Sheet3
The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub © John Gollings

3. Chadstone Shopping Centre

Architect: CallisonRTKL and The Buchan Group

An expansion of the shopping center that becomes the centerpiece of the project; a gridshell glass roof which was multidisciplinary cooperation from the University of Stuttgart and the University of Bath. The designers and engineers took a parametric design approach in their design phase. The gridshell acts as a boundary between the supporting structure and the roof. It is the main standout component of the whole shopping center.

Chadstone Shopping Centre - Sheet1
Chadstone Shopping Centre ©Seele
Chadstone Shopping Centre - Sheet2
Chadstone Shopping Centre ©Seele
Chadstone Shopping Centre - Sheet3
Chadstone Shopping Centre ©Seele

4. Garden State Hotel

Architect: Techne Architecture and Interior Design

A four-storey bar with the main hub of a multi-level beer garden; the hotel’s exterior preserves the inheritance of the Victorian era and has a spectacular concealed botanical harbor. The architect creates a design flow between the different functional spaces.

Garden State Hotel - Sheet1
Garden State Hotel ©Shannon McGrath
Garden State Hotel - Sheet2
Garden State Hotel ©Shannon McGrath
Garden State Hotel - Sheet3
Garden State Hotel ©Shannon McGrath

5. Yellow Earth

Architect: TANDEM design studio

The architects focus on the experience of the users. The knitted wool acts as a showcased wall cladding that feels light to the eyes and creates a transparent boundary between the spaces. This allows for an opportunity for the users to do window shopping as well. The architect has taken a playful approach in designing the space by interconnecting the woven display cones, the cantilevered containers along with retail design elements.

Yellow Earth - Sheet1
Yellow Earth ©NicGranleese
Yellow Earth - Sheet2
Yellow Earth ©NicGranleese
Yellow Earth - Sheet3
Yellow Earth ©NicGranleese

6. MY80

Architect: Hayball

An apartment that became the significant business hub of Melbourne; a vertical structure at the ground level offers retail spaces and the above levels are commercial properties and apartments. Through the building’s form and the use of material, the building comprises 487 apartments including a lounge, swimming pool, cinema, and a terrace.

MY80 - Sheet1
MY80 ©Peter Clarke
MY80 - Sheet2
MY80 ©Shannon McGrath
MY80 - Sheet3
MY80 ©Shannon McGrath

7. Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne

Architect: NADAAA + John Wardle Architects

An international competition that took forward towards the final stage of construction; the university is a reflection of the university principles made in 2008. A large flexible space to the center of the building is the Studio Hall. It is enclosed by a timber roof that facilitates the natural sunshine and ventilation into the building.

Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne - Sheet1
Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne ©John Horner
Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne - Sheet2
Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne ©John Horner
Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne - Sheet3
Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne ©John Horner

8. La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science

Architect: Lyons

The architect took an approach to bring in a transformative effect in the form as well as the architecture itself.  The various cellular frameworks on the exterior is a reflection of molecular research happening in the building. It also aids in various functions as well as brings in natural light into the building. The staircase plays a major role in the building by connecting all the research modules and the students.

La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science - Sheet1
La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science ©Lyons
La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science - Sheet2
La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science ©Lyons
La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science - Sheet3
La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science ©Lyons

9. Hamer Hall

Architect: ARM Architecture

Representations of “the architectural story of the castle and the mine” and “the theatrical story of the palace and the cave of jewels”; the architects create an outward-facing venue to make it more accessible and inviting to the public.

Hamer Hall - Sheet1
Hamer Hall ©John Gollings
Hamer Hall - Sheet2
Hamer Hall ©Peter Bennetts
Hamer Hall - Sheet3
Hamer Hall ©John Gollings

10. Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar

Architect: HASSELL

The use of shipping containers and timber pallet arrangement plays with an interesting element of surprise. The inspiration of the Urban Coffee Farm was driven to create a story of how coffee is made and to inspire the coffee lovers. The main idea is to give the visitors a takeaway of knowledge, experience, and a cup of coffee.

Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar - Sheet1
Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar ©Bonnie Savage
Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar - Sheet2
Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar ©Bonnie Savage
Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar - Sheet3
Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar ©Bonnie Savage

11. Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

Architect: Woods Bagot and NH Architecture

The center became a focal point in the urban setting of Melbourne. The three-sided form is a reflection of the site context. The architect has attempted to use timber to reflect Australia’s marine history through its textural qualities. The foyer opens to a grand public gathering and a direct view of the Yarra River. The different spaces in the exhibition center are designed according to the various aspects of Melbourne.

Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre - Sheet1
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre ©Woods Bagot
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre - Sheet2
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre ©Woods Bagot
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre - Sheet3
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre ©Woods Bagot

12. Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre

Architect: H2o architects

The center is a combination of a gymnasium, a multipurpose hall, and a learning center. With these different functions, it makes the place for the community. The use of colors and extravagant patterns creates an interest for the children to visit the place.

Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre - Sheet1
Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre ©Trevor Mein
Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre - Sheet2
Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre ©Trevor Mein
Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre - Sheet3
Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre ©Trevor Mein

13. The Canada Hotel

Architect: Hayball

A student accommodation that connects purpose and performance; the geometric façade that spirals around the building creates a rhythm of denseness, emptiness, light, and grey shades.  The building was a cost-effective construction by the use of mass-produced concrete and steel frameworks.

The Canada Hotel - Sheet1
The Canada Hotel ©John Gollings
The Canada Hotel - Sheet2
The Canada Hotel ©Tony Miller
The Canada Hotel - Sheet3
The Canada Hotel ©Rob Stent

14. Myer Department Store

Architect: Peddle Thorp Architects

An award-winning design at the Oracle World Retail Awards in 2011; the architects were assigned to design the Level 5, 6, and 7 of the store. The top-level 6th and 7th designs were inspired by organic architecture to create a futuristic effect. A simplicity element is introduced on level 5 and this approach highlights the brands in the store.

Myer Department Store - Sheet1
Myer Department Store ©Peddle Thorp Architects
Myer Department Store - Sheet2
Myer Department Store ©Peddle Thorp Architects
Myer Department Store - Sheet3
Myer Department Store ©Peddle Thorp Architects

15. Phoenix Rooftop

Architect: BENT Architecture

An exposed space placed in the heart of Melbourne. The rooftop garden provides the area to be explored. The space allows various uses for the visitor, for instance, to sit and enjoy the views or even have a BBQ party with friends and family. The use of garden beds, the fragrant plants, the mosaics tiles creates an abstraction to space itself.

Phoenix Rooftop - Sheet1
Phoenix Rooftop ©Dianna Snape
Phoenix Rooftop - Sheet2
Phoenix Rooftop ©Dianna Snape
Phoenix Rooftop - Sheet3
Phoenix Rooftop ©Dianna Snape

Bibliography

architects, H. (2011). Avondale Heights Library and Learning Centre / H2o architects. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/135663/avondale-heights-library-and-learning-centre-h2o-architects

Architects, N. &. (2015). Melbourne School of Design University of Melbourne / NADAAA + John Wardle Architects. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/622708/melbourne-school-of-design-university-of-melbourne-john-wardle-architects-nadaaa

Architects, P. T. (2011). Myer Department Store / Peddle Thorp Architects. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/179934/myer-department-store-peddle-thorp-architects

Bagot, W. (2013). Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre / Woods Bagot. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/331339/melbourne-convention-and-exhibition-centre-woods-bagot-2

Castro, F. (2018). Phoenix Rooftop / BENT Architecture. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/895271/phoenix-rooftop-bent-architecture?ad_source=search&ad_medium=search_result_all

Castro, F. (2018). The Geoff Handbury Science and Technology Hub / Denton Corker Marshall. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/892419/the-geoff-handbury-science-and-technology-hub-denton-corker-marshall

Design, T. A. (2016). Garden State Hotel / Techne Architecture + Interior Design. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/795179/garden-state-hotel-techne-architecture-plus-interior-design

Group, C. &. (2017). Chadstone Shopping Centre / CallisonRTKL + The Buchan Group. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/804275/chadstone-shopping-centre-callisonrtkl-plus-the-buchan-group

Hamer Hall / ARM Architecture. (2013). Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/347581/hamer-hall-arm-architecture

HASSELL. (2013). Urban Coffee Farm and Brew Bar / HASSELL. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/339637/urban-coffee-farm-and-brew-bar-hassell

Hayball. (2010). The Canada Hotel / Hayball. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/65105/the-canada-hotel-hayball

Hayball. (2015). MY80 / Hayball. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/769657/my80-hayball

Lyons. (2013). La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science / Lyons. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/355680/la-trobe-institute-for-molecular-science-lyons

Pintos, P. (2020, May). In Absence Pavilion / Edition Office + Yhonnie Scarce. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/938826/in-absence-pavilion-edition-office-plus-yhonnie-scarce?ad_source=search&ad_medium=search_result_all

studio, T. d. (2015). Yellow Earth / TANDEM design studio. Retrieved from Archdaily: https://www.archdaily.com/777846/yellow-earth-tandem-design-studio

Devasri Jeganathan
Author

Devasri is an architecture student. She seeks innovation in all her work and always has a passion to design for the people around her. Deva believes creativity is a mind to the paper process and is always ready to think out of the box and push the boundaries.

Write A Comment