11. Guggenheim, Hans Hollein

Location: Salzburg, Austria
Year: 1989

Winner of an international competition in Salzburg, the proposal of Hollein stood out from the rest of the entries with its eccentric approach to the site. Designed on a huge rock formation, symbolic of Salzburg’s scenic landscape, the museum was enclosed completely in the rock, allowing light to penetrate from a central void and well-positioned skylights. With no visible facades, the unbuilt museum presents to this day a muse of its kind for various designs.

Complete Architecture Package for Design Studios
Guggenheim, Hans Hollein - Sheet1
Sketch of the central void ©www.hollein.com
Guggenheim, Hans Hollein - Sheet2
Physical model of the museum ©www.hollein.com
Guggenheim, Hans Hollein - Sheet3
Original sections of the project ©www.hollein.com

12. Bangkok HyperBuilding, OMA/ Rem Koolhaas

Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Year: 1996

A leader on visionary designs, the Office for Metropolitan Architecture launched the theoretical project to tackle the concerns of 21st-century architecture and urbanism. Wildly-knit buildings and systems reach one kilometer in height to accommodate over 120,000 people. A sort of mega-neighborhood, the design intends to function as a self-contained city. With train elevators and cable cars, the cutting edge concept integrates all city functions and services, encouraging people to travel less while still enjoying an abundance of green spaces.

Bangkok HyperBuilding, OMA/ Rem Koolhaas - Sheet1
Render of design ©www.architectureanddesign.com.au
Bangkok HyperBuilding, OMA/ Rem Koolhaas - Sheet2
Rem Koolhas’ Sketch ©archidialog.com
Bangkok HyperBuilding, OMA/ Rem Koolhaas - Sheet3
A model of the design ©www.tangkwokhin.com

13. The Spiral, Daniel Libeskind

Location: London, England
Year: 1996

The extension to the Victoria and Albert Museum, proposed by Libeskind, is still one of the most provocative projects to stupify Londoners. Conceived on a historic street of 19th-century architecture, the chaotic play of volumes stood out unapologetically from its context, keeping its legacy to this day, even with being unbuilt.

Complete Architecture Package for Students
The Spiral, Daniel Libeskind - Sheet1
Exterior render of the project ©www.archdaily.com
The Spiral, Daniel Libeskind - Sheet2
Model of the project ©www.andrewputler.com
The Spiral, Daniel Libeskind - Sheet3
Exterior render of the project ©www.archdaily.com

14. The Scottish Parliament, Richard Meier, and Partners architects

Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Year: 1999

The proposal for the new Scottish parliament is an unbuilt example of the architectural finesse displayed by the architect through his projects. Encompassing four built forms, the project established a new relationship between the volumes, allowing flow and transparency as the leading features of the whole complex.

The Scottish Parliament, Richard Meier, and Partners architects - Sheet1
A 3d model of the project ©www.parlamaid.scot
The Scottish Parliament, Richard Meier, and Partners architects - Sheet2
A 3D model of the project ©www.parlamaid.scot
The Scottish Parliament, Richard Meier, and Partners architects - Sheet3
Site plan ©www.parlamaid.scot

15. Fourth Grace, Will Alsop

Location: Liverpool, England
Year: 2002

Taking its name from the adjacent historic buildings, known as ‘the three graces’, the design was part of the development plan for Liverpool, the European capital for culture 2008 bid. Winning against renowned architects like Foster and partners, the proposal incorporated residential areas, offices, and a cloud-like museum. It is said that the project was dropped due to being too provocative to public opinion.

Fourth Grace, Will Alsop - Sheet1
Photo-realistic render of Fourth Grace ©www.dezeen.com
Fourth Grace, Will Alsop - Sheet2
Photo-realistic interior render ©www.allcadblocks.com
Fourth Grace, Will Alsop - Sheet3
Photo-realistic render ©viewfinder.expedia.com

16. Shimizu Mega City Pyramid, Shimizu Corporation

Location: Tokyo, Japan
Year: 2004

Conceived to accommodate 1 million people, the avant-garde pyramid was destined to become the largest man-made structure. But as today’s materials are not capable of bearing construction of this scale, the conceptual project bets on the invention of a strong, yet lightweight material.

Shimizu Mega City Pyramid, Shimizu Corporation - Sheet1
Photorealistic render courtesy of Onward ©www.archdaily.com
Shimizu Mega City Pyramid, Shimizu Corporation - Sheet2
3D model of the pyramid ©www.planetminecraft.com
Shimizu Mega City Pyramid, Shimizu Corporation - Sheet3
Perspective drawing ©forums.hipinion.com

17. Dubai Opera House, Zaha Hadid

Location: Dubai, UAE
Year: 2006

 

Designed as a new Opera house and cultural center for performing arts, the Project was located in the new Seven Pearls district in Dubai. The design was unprecedented in its fluidity and flow around Dubai. One bold dune-like structure houses the diverse functions of the program while conveying the most seamless connection with the surrounding landscape.

Dubai Opera House, Zaha Hadid - Sheet1
Photorealistic render of the Opera House ©www.flickr.com
Dubai Opera House, Zaha Hadid - Sheet2
Photorealistic render of the Opera House ©www.flickr.com
Dubai Opera House, Zaha Hadid - Sheet3
Physical model of the project ©www.iwoodfloors.com

18. The Crystal Island, Norman Foster

Location: Moscow, Russia
Year: 2008

Conceived as the largest building in the world, the tower was to cover a floor area of 2,5 million square meters. A diverse mix of amenities along with two viewing platforms would have been enough to turn this ambitious design into a daily destination to all of Moscow. However, as the economic recession hit, the project had to be canceled.

The Crystal Island, Norman Foster - Sheet1
Photo-realistic view of the project ©www.dezeen.com
The Crystal Island, Norman Foster - Sheet2
Photo-realistic close-up ©www.dezeen.com
The Crystal Island, Norman Foster - Sheet3
Photorealistic render from sky view ©inhabitat.com

19. Nakheel Tower, Woods Bagot

Location: Dubai, UAE
Year: 2009

Destined to become the highest concrete structure in the world, The Nakheel tower took its inspiration from Islamic design features and virtues to become a true emblematic sign of Dubai’s inclusivity, excellence, and unstoppable growth. The concept of the complex was to incubate the world’s first inner-harbor, along with lavishing residential and office spaces.

Nakheel Tower, Woods Bagot - Sheet
Photorealistic render of the project ©www.pinterest.com
Nakheel Tower, Woods Bagot - Sheet2
Photorealistic render of a close-up ©newatlas.com
Nakheel Tower, Woods Bagot - Sheet3
Photorealistic render of the project in its context ©www.pinterest.de

20. M+ Museum, Shigeru Ban

Location: Hong Kong, China
Year: 2013

The shortlisted design stood out for its unique approach to connectivity and sustainability. The star shape of the building allowed for several five operable facades, providing a continuous flow between interior and exterior. Even though it did not win the competition, the project remains a valuable architectural contribution.

M+ Museum, Shigeru Ban - Sheet1
Exterior render of the project ©www.designboom.com
M+ Museum, Shigeru Ban - Sheet2
Exterior render of the project ©www.designboom.com
M+ Museum, Shigeru Ban - Sheet3
Physical model of the project ©bluebalu.com

 

1 2
Author

Creative at heart, Joelle is currently completing her Master of Architecture in Beirut. Joining curiosity with her love for wandering, she is usually drawnto philosophy and travel to find answers and expand her knowledge. She is currently intrigued by the way humans experience cities, so you might find her Instagram filling with shots of her urban explorations.

Write A Comment