Project: Noma 2.0, Copenhagen, Denmark
Client: Noma
Architect: Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)
Project Typology: Cultural, Commercial
Project Area: 1290 m2 

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet1
View of Noma 2.0 ©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet2
Site Surroundings ©big.dk

Noma, a two-Michelin star restaurant, is situated between two lakes and within the community of Christiana. It is built on a protected ex-military warehouse site, which was once used to store mines for the Royal Danish Navy. As known for its reinvention and interpretation of Nordic Cuisine, the new branch was created as an intimate culinary garden village where guests are welcomed to experience a new menu and philosophy

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet3
©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet4
A glance of somenidepotet ©big.dk

The primary design problem was to create a new home for one of the most highly regarded, wildly experimental restaurants in the world with respecting the military heritage and strict regulations of the site and building. This is because Sominedepotet was a listed storage facility for sea mines built at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, along with the fortifications of Copenhagen, Sominedepotet is a protected national landmark. The clients not only wanted a new home for the restaurant but also emphasized the need to create a welcoming atmosphere where the guests and staff were also connected to the natural surroundings of the site.

PHILOSOPHY AND PLANNING CONCEPT

Given the requirements, Central to the design became the inspiration found in the traditional Nordic Farm typology called “the saeter.” According to BIG – “A saeter can be described as a loose cluster of individual buildings, housing specific functions, spread across the landscape- and the arctic village, where buildings are closely related yet visually diverse variations of the same type.” Hence, the architects tried to entail creating a “community,” as the initial approach of new buildings, situated at the southern end of the existing structure. 

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet5
Extension area ©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet6
Front of house program ©big.dk

As the concept – the front of the house program is where guests share primary experiences split into individual units by functions. In the front of the house, a total of eleven spaces are custom-made to their specific needs and are densely clustered around the restaurant‘s hearts, putting the chefs at the heart of it all. The back of the house fits right into the existing structure of Sominedepotet. 

It is placed in an efficient, long bar of services that is accessible via a significant passage along the east-facing wall. The greenhouses are located on the last three existing foundations, which work as a garden, a test kitchen, and a bakery. 

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet7
Planning – service kitchen + dishwashing area ©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet8
Service kitchen ©big.dk

As described, the heart of the densely clustered built form is the service kitchen, which is situated close to the prep kitchen and the dishwashing area in the existing building to provide a smooth functioning during meal service. Its position in the center ensures good visual and physical connections to all other functions providing the chef’s a full overview and control of everything happening during service. According to BIG– “each building within the building is linked by glass-covered paths for chefs and guests to follow the changes in weather, daylight and seasons – making the natural surroundings an intrinsic part of the culinary experience.”

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet9
Greenhouses ©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet10
Building cluster like the village ©big.dk

MATERIALS 

The restaurant showcases an open floor plan, created in a manner wherein the guests can experience and enjoy chefs cooking. The spaces are built to showcase the use of local materials and construction techniques, which relate to the site’s heritage value. The 40 cover dining room and private dining arena are made of stacked timber planks wherein space overlooks the site’s grasslands and lake. 

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet11
©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet12
©big.dk

A large skylight and an expansive set of windows that slide help reveals the outdoor permaculture garden, allowing guests to truly appreciate all the seasons and the natural environment of the site. This was one of the many reasons for selecting this site as an appropriate space to build the restaurant. 

Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet13
View of open kitchen + dining ©big.dk
Noma,Denmark by Bjarke Ingels: Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet14
View of greenhouse garden ©big.dk

The interiors prominently consist of light wood and glass, which simultaneously help the chefs and guests enjoy the culinary experience in a light-breezy sense. According to BIG- “the barbeque is a giant walk-in hut, and the lounge looks and feels like a giant, cozy fireplace constructed entirely of brick, inside out.”  

Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet15
View of grasslands ©big.dk
Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet16
©big.dk
Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet17
©big.dk
Modernism Meets Scandinavian - Sheet18
©big.dk

The ceilings range from simple A-frame gables to overlapping planks to a ribbed sequence of beams, varying in angle and height in order to create a gratifying, upside-down topography. 

 

Author

Ansha Kohli is whimsical andenigmatic when it comes to her life. Wanting to pursue a career in architecture journalism after completing her graduation, she is on the road to seek something new and exciting, and subsequently enthusiastic to share as well as understand different philosophies associated with art and architecture.

Write A Comment