The project is located on a south-facing hillside in the northern part of the Jiangangshan neighborhood in the Baoan District of Shenzhen, China. Twenty years ago, the first batch of garden houses were built between here and it has gradually grown into the largest low-density residential area in western Shenzhen. Its public facilities have not kept pace, with Parkhill Greens and its surrounding streetscapes adding 4,000 square meters of new park land, the only public open space in the neighborhood.

Project Name: Parkhill Greens
Office Name: PLAT Studio
Office Website: platstudio.net

Design Team: Fred Liao, Kit Shih-Ting Wang, Shih-Lin Lan, Maggie Kao, Xiaoqing Qin, Tiger Sui, Yinhua Hua, , David Jing Peng, Sophanut Jamonak, Siting Huo, Iris Soh, Daniel Wang, Xiangyu Li, Yinuo Sun, Katrina Ortiz, Joan Zhong
Firm Location: Berkeley, CA
Completion Year: 2021
Gross Built Area (m2/ ft2): 4,0000 m2
Project location: Shenzhen, China
Program: Public park, green infrastructure
Client: Vanke Shenzhen
Vanke Shenzhen Landscape Team: Qi Lin, Wu Zhitong, Shao Quan, Ji Huimin, Zhang Xiexin, Guo Yanchen, Li Sen

Consultants:

Construction Drawings: OEA
Landscape Construction: Pubang Landscape ArchitectureCo., Ltd.
Playground and sports equipment: Liben Group
Signage: Golden Talent Advertising Co., Ltd
Lighting: Matt Lighting Design Associates
Rainwater Systems: Shenzhen Green Environment Technology Co., Ltd
Architectural Design: Shenzhen Huahui Design Co., Ltd.
Construction Documentation: Zhubo Design Co., Ltd.
Interior Design: Karv One
Photo Credits:  ACF Photography, Holi Photography

Parkhill Greens by PLAT Studio - Sheet4
©ACF Photography, Holi Photography

Parkhill Greens is acting as a green hub, connecting the public realm, old and new residential areas, new business districts and schools, and highlighting the neighborhood’s natural beauty. Using elegant design strategies, the park provides modern amenities to promote a vibrant, social and health-focused park. The verdant space balances ecological and human needs; managing rainwater and mitigating urban heat island effect, while setting the stage for a lively neighborhood with activities for all ages.

Parkhill Greens by PLAT Studio - Sheet6
©ACF Photography, Holi Photography

SYSTEMATIC DESIGN OF COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE: STARTING AT THE CORE OF A FOOTHILL COMMUNITY

Designers studied the context to plan a forward-thinking community that will be comfortable while accommodating a high density of residents. The next round of development will bring new neighbors to the park, breathing it to life. The space will be an anchor, inviting residents to build community in the comfort and calm of urban nature. The three elements of neighborhood open spaces — park, streets and homes — are designed to work as a complimentary system, building the framework for an inviting community.

  

Parkhill Greens by PLAT Studio - Sheet8
©ACF Photography, Holi Photography

A NEW PARK FOR A HIGH-DENSITY COMMUNITY: PEOPLE-ORIENTED, COMPACT AND FLEXIBLE

The site has a significant grade change and an unusual shape. However these unique features set the stage for a distinctive design language – with gradual slopes, steps and retaining walls coming together to create people-oriented spaces. Efficiently using space for a variety of functions and flowing from one area to another, the result is a strong central gesture with lush planting surrounding each area.

VIBRANT STREETS FOR SAFETY, GREENERY AND COMMUNITY

The streetscapes extend the park’s calm atmosphere, with narrow roads to slow traffic and wide tree-lined sidewalks to encourage walking. Bike and running paths give space for faster movement while being separated from auto traffic. Custom street furniture gives the street a distinct public realm for residents to enjoy with any mode of transport.

Parkhill Greens by PLAT Studio - Sheet9
©ACF Photography, Holi Photography

ECOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK: KEEP MATURE TREES AND ABSORB STORMWATER

Due to the high volume of rain in the wet season, the park acts as a sponge for the neighborhood to prevent flooding. A large underground basin is connected to overflow pipes to create a rainwater system that holds water onsite until storms pass. Signage shows visitors how the system works to increase engagement with the local ecology.

Author

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