About Neuschwantein Castle 

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neuschwantein castle_©https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.neuschwanstein.de%2Fenglisch%2Fpalace%2Fhistory.htm&psig=AOvVaw08jte0EccDsUo3ck0Fj6h8&ust=1705343707404000&source=images&cd=vfe&opi=89978449&ved=0CBUQjhxqFwoTCPiDmfLC3YMDFQAAAAAdAAAAABAI
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king ludwig _©Thegermanway.com

Neuschwanstein Castle, also known as simply Neuschwanstein and meaning “new swan’s stone,” is a sizable, globally renowned castle in the Bavaria region of southeast Germany. Neuschwanstein’s building was commissioned by King Ludwig II of Bavaria and started in 1869. Ludwig was raised in the adjacent Hohenschwangau Castle, which means “high county of the swan” and was rebuilt and maintained by his father, Maximilian II. In 1864, at eighteen, Ludwig took the throne, but by the time he was twenty, he had already experienced a significant setback in his reign. In what is known as the “German War,” Prussia triumphed over Bavaria in 1866. Germany was not a single nation during this period, and stronger nations like Prussia had ambitions for areas like Bavaria. The fact that Prussia won and Bavaria’s affairs were managed in Munich, which was about sixty miles away, further reduced Ludwig’s authority as emperor. He was going to retreat to Neuschwanstein.

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castle during construction _©johannes Bernard

A Synopsis of Neuschwanstein Castle’s History

In the middle of the 1800s, Bavarian King Ludwig II was raised in the southern German castle of Hohenschwangau. In 1868, Munich set designer Christian Jank was commissioned by Ludwig to create plans for a new castle, his ambition being to recreate his childhood home. Drawings by Jank were the basis for plans created by architect Eduard Riedel. The fall of 1869 saw the start of construction, which was beset by financial difficulties and lasted for several years. Finally, in 1884, the Bavarian king moved into his royal castle, where he remained until he died in 1886. The castle was then made public after that. During the early 1900s, Walt Disney took a day excursion to Neuschwanstein Castle while touring Europe. He discovered architectural inspiration there for the Sleeping Beauty Castle, built in the 1950s in the heart of Disneyland. Though it doesn’t appear exactly like Neuschwanstein, another Disney castle from the Cinderella film was not influenced by it, despite what many people think.

  1. Architectural style: Byzantine, Gothic, and Romanesque designs are all included in the construction of Neuschwanstein Castle. A mediaeval castle in the idealized image was commissioned by King Ludwig II, also known as the “Fairy Tale King.” It was designed primarily for aesthetic reasons rather than defensive considerations, despite its resemblance to traditional castles.
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    Architecture of castle _©us library of congress

    Interior design: The throne room, an artificial cave grotto, and the opulent Singer’s Hall are all located inside the castle. Richard Wagner’s compositions served as one of King Ludwig II’s main sources of inspiration for the interior design of Neuschwanstein Castle. Legends from the past served as inspiration for Wagner’s operas, such as his epic Tannhäuser. All over Neuschwanstein Castle, mythical figures were interwoven into the interior design.

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interior of castle _©us library of congress
  1. Technology: Telephone lines, running water, indoor plumbing, and central heating were among the modern conveniences King Ludwig II insisted on having installed in his palace.

The architecture of the castle 

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plan of  castle _©keinberged

One of the most amazing architectural achievements and the finest illustration of Mediaeval Romanticism in architecture is Neuschwanstein. The Singer’s Hall, Study, King’s Apartment, Salon, and Throne Room in particular are regarded as architectural and artistic marvels. Beautiful artwork and architectural details may be seen throughout the entire castle, even though these chambers are truly marvels.

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Architecture of castle _©janis from flicker

The residential tract’s first level, which shared the same layout as the floors above, was set aside for the use of servants. On the valley side, there was a vaulted hallway between two parallel suites. Large, pricey furniture was arranged along the walls of these spaces, which included elaborate paneling on the walls. The Royal Spiral Staircase leads through the ribbed vault corridor on this floor and ends on the top floor in a circular temple encircled by columns. A massive stone dragon with its mouth gaping open and roaring silently is seated at the top of the stairs. This statue stands watch over the Singer’s Hall anteroom entrance. Beside it, the staircase’s newel, which resembles a tree trunk, climbs to the ceiling and opens to reveal branches dripping with dates and leaves. The date palm’s green fronds mix in perfectly with the nighttime blue of the ceiling, which is adorned with glittering stars. His characteristic, which is evocative of the Wartburg eagle capitals, seems out of place because it is more in line with the Art Nouveau style than the Romanesque architecture that predominates throughout the remainder of the castle . The Singer’s Hall occupies the entire fourth level on the eastern side of the palace, beyond the stairs.

 History of Neuschwanstein After Construction

Neuschwanstein was made accessible to the public as a tourist destination seven weeks following Ludwig’s passing. The Bavarian Royal Family’s primary source of income was soon the castle ( Bavarian Department of State-owned Palaces, Gardens and Lakes). Thousands of tourists were captivated by the castle’s distinctive design and picturesque setting, even though it was built as a hermit’s retreat. Neuschwanstein opened to the public as a tourist destination seven weeks after Ludwig passed away. For the Bavarian Royal Family (Bavarian Department of State-owned Palaces, Gardens, and Lakes), the castle soon became their primary source of revenue. Thousands of visitors were drawn to the castle by its unusual design and picturesque setting, even though it was built as a solitary hermit’s haven.

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Architecture of castle _©flicker

 A Nazi Party subsidiary, the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg für die Besetzen Gebiete (Reichsleiter Rosenberg Institute for the Occupied Territories) acquired ownership of the castle during World War II. This organization stored Nazi loot from France in the castle. To make it simple to identify each piece of art’s location, the artwork was photographed and categorized. These images were then organized into albums. 39 photo albums that were discovered in the palace following the war provide an overview of the size and scope of the artifacts kept at Neuschwanstein (National Archives). The National Archives of the United States currently houses the albums.

The Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg für die Besetzen Gebiete, a Nazi Party subsidiary, became the castle’s owner during World War II. This group stored Nazi loot from France in the castle. To make it simple to identify each piece of art’s location, the artwork was photographed and categorized. These images were then organized into albums. 39 photo albums that were discovered within the palace following the war provide an overview of the size and scope of the artifacts kept at Neuschwanstein (National Archives). The albums are currently kept in the National Archives of the United States of America.

The castle of Neuschwanstein in Southern Bavaria is one of the greatest architectural marvels of the world. It was the creation of the defeated king, Ludwig II, in a time when most of his power had been taken from him. It was to be his refuge and a place where he could immerse himself in old German legends and the works of his idol, Richard Wagner, that had so colored his childhood. To construct this vision, Ludwig’s architects had to use the most modern innovations in building materials and practices available. They even outfitted the castle with all the modern luxuries that were available at the time. This focus on function, however, did not take away from the form of the castle.

Author

A recent graduate, passionate about learning tangible and intangible concepts and ideas relating to space, time and people, is mostly interested in looking at how built spaces is a medium of cultural and social identity. Architecture for her is constant search. she is interested in representing built designs better with graphics,drawings and writing.