Bangalore the silicon valley of India the home to startups is not just a modern city conceived for a contemporary urban population the city has a long and beautiful history. The evolution of the city has witnessed great architecture at every turn in history up until recent times. Once a part of Tipu Sultan’s Mysore Kingdom, the city has much to offer to its architecturally inclined patrons even today.     

1. Vidhanasoudha

Built post-independence era, this monument was designed to house the offices of Karnataka’s state government. Designed by B.R.Manickam the building is built in the neo-Dravidian style of architecture i.e apart from its classical European features it also derived heavily from Indo-Saracenic architecture. 

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Vidhanasoudha ©commons.wikimedia.org

2. Bangalore fort 

A fortressed city envisioned by the then King KempeGowda Bangalore has grown beyond its walls. Initially made out of mud, the city walls were constructed in stone during the reign of Hyder Ali. Not much remains of the Bangalore fort today apart from its gates. Tipu Sultans’ summer palace was located in the complex but now seems like a separate complex in itself.

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Bangalore Fort ©en.wikipedia.org

3. Bangalore Palace

Touted to be inspired by the British Windsor castle the Bangalore palace was built for Chamaraja Wadiyar in the year 1878. The design is a mix of Tudor and Scottish Gothic architecture, much of the internal furnishing elements were imported from Britain. The two-storied granite palace with its opulent wooden interiors, reflect Maharaja’s love for the finer things in life.

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Bangalore Fort ©medium.com
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Bangalore Fort ©www.digitalkaleidoscope.in

4. Tipu Sultan’s summer palace

The summer palace was built to serve the Ruler of Mysore Tipu sultan who ascended the throne in 1782. The two-storied palace was built in Indo-Islamic style of architecture mostly out of teak wood. The intricate wooden details and the darbar of the King give us a glimpse into the opulent lives of the Mysore royalty.

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Tipu Sultan’s summer palace ©trip101.com
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Tipu Sultan’s summer palace ©trip101.com

5. Bangalore Highcourt 

Also known as the Attara Kacheri the high court is located opposite the Vidhana Soudha and was initially known as the High court of Mysore province. The red stone and brick structure was designed in the Greco-Roman style of architecture with a colonnade of Ionic pillars stretched across its façade was completed in the year 1868.

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6. Visvesvaraya Tower

This very place was once the house of Sir M Visvesvarayya. The government of Karnataka later converted the place into an office complex which is named in his memory. The office building was designed by the late architect Charles Correa and is one of the few specimens of Brutalist architecture in India.

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Visvesvaraya Tower ©benbansal.me
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7. Seshadri Memorial library 

The building was built in the honor of Sir K.Sheshadri Iyer, regarded as the ‘architect of modern Bangalore’. Completed in the year 1913 the red building was designed in the classical European style of architecture with Tuscan and Corinthian columns. The library is the home of many literary classics that cannot be found anywhere else in India.

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8. Sir Puttanna Chetty Town Hall

This neo-classical building located at the junction of JC Road and NR Road is sure to catch every passerby’s eye. The town hall was inaugurated in 1935 to commemorate the contributions of K.P Puttanna Chetty who was a great philanthropist of the city. Even after close seven decades of its manifestation, the building to date is serving the residents of Bangalore.

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Sir Puttanna Chetty Town Hall ©transnationalarchitecturegroup.wordpress.com

9. Lalbagh Botanical Garden

The garden was commissioned by the then Ruler of Mysore Hyder Ali in 1760 among the growing popularity of the Mughal gardens. Tipu Sultan introduced the concept of horticulture to gardens and later a variety of species of plants were imported from different countries. The glasshouse was later built under the supervision of Sir Seshadri Iyer which now hosts the flower festival twice a year.

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10. Freedom Park

A symbol of colonial rule, when the government declared an emergency in 1975, renowned opposition leaders like the late Atal Bihari Vajpayee and L.K. Advani were jailed here, in the Old Bangalore Central Jail which has now been converted into the Freedom Park. The place will give a peek into the first gallows of Karnataka and retains much of the old barracks and watchtower.

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11. IIM Bangalore

The institute of management has been designed by master architect B.V.Doshi. Breaking away from the traditional consolidated plans the institute has been designed in divided nuclear structures that are joined together in landscaped corridors. The dominant and recurring transitional spaces throughout the campus create an engaging visual experience.

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12. ISKCON Temple

Inaugurated in May 1997 to commemorate the founder Sri Prabhupada, Iskcon Temple Bangalore is one of ISKCON’s largest temple complexes in the world. Built-in the neoclassical style of architecture, the design combines the elements of traditional South-Indian style with a contemporary style of architecture.

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ISKCON Temple ©www.thrillophilia.com

13. All Saints Church

The beautiful Gothic revival styled church with its unique pitched roof is perhaps the only structure in Bangalore which was designed by the celebrated architect Robert Fellowes Chisholm. The plan is a traditional Latin cross with Nave and Transepts.

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All Saints Church ©aturquoisecloud.wordpress.com
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All Saints Church ©www.allsaintscsi.org

 

 

14. IISc Bangalore

A brainchild of Jamsetji Tata, the Indian Institute of Science was completed in the year 1919. The beautiful colonial-era building was designed by architect C.F Steven, the main building is designed in classical style with a 150-foot tall grey granite tower standing tall in the center. 

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15. Cubbon Park 

Created in the late 19th century the park today almost occupies close to 300 acres of land and is quite aptly called the lungs of the city. The park is well known for its abundant flora and is also home to quite a few historical buildings.

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Anand Kugatoli
Author

Anand is a practicing architect and an avid reader. He is now exploring his journey from being a reader to becoming a writer. Combining his passion in architecture and writing he is pursuing his interest in architectural journalism and what better place to start than here at RTF.

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