Exuding individuality and professing growth potential at a lucrative rate, Dallas city has pinned a mark of significance on the global map. Being a home town to many architecture visions, Dallas hosts numerous architecture firms of international standards actively being on the forefront in creating architectural designs of high value and regard. Heavily influenced by the changing urban scenarios of Dallas city, architecture has evolved in prominent ways throughout the years. 

With the architectural landscape intrinsically ingrained to the society’s cultural and commercial fabric, Dallas exhibits various architecture styles from Victorian to Neoclassical profoundly and theatrically, serving a visual study for aspiring architects and architecture enthusiasts. 

Here are the 15 examples:

1. Reunion Tower alias ‘The Ball’, Designed by: Welton Becket & Associates

Completed in the year 1978, the 561 ft (171 m) Reunion Tower serves as an observation tower at Dallas rendering breathtaking panoramic views of the city landscape. With numerous telescopes to view from, prominent restaurants and cafes to indulge in, the Reunion Tower gives a glimpse of the city.

Reunion Tower alias ‘The Ball’, Designed by: Welton Becket & Associates - Sheet1
Reunion Tower along the skylines of Dallas ©hudsoncreative.com
Reunion Tower alias ‘The Ball’, Designed by: Welton Becket & Associates - Sheet2
Reunion Tower observation deck and cafe ©www.upscalelivingmag.com
Reunion Tower alias ‘The Ball’, Designed by: Welton Becket & Associates - Sheet3
View from the Reunion Tower © www.upscalelivingmag.com

2. Thanks-Giving Square, Designed by: Architect Philip Johnson

Opened to the public in 1977, the stunning 90 ft tall cylindrical chapel, the garden, and the fountains of the Thanks-Giving Square is one of the finest architectural projects of the city.

Thanks-Giving Square, Designed by: Architect Philip Johnson - Sheet1
Aerial view of the chapel ©www.pinterest.co.uk
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Stained glasswork of the chapel ©thomortiz.tumblr.com
Thanks-Giving Square, Designed by: Architect Philip Johnson - Sheet3
Chapel with the surrounding garden ©app.cuseum.com

3. Fountain Place Tower, Designed by: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Henry N. Cobb, Harry Weese Associates, and WZMH Architects

Completed in 1986, the Fountain Place Tower is a massive 60 story late-modernist skyscraper with an impressive prism facade. The facade geometry lends different profiles to the building when viewed from different directions.

Fountain Place Tower, Designed by: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Henry N. Cobb, Harry Weese Associates, and WZMH Architects - Sheet1
Iconic Fountain Place tower ©www.pcf-p.com
Fountain Place Tower, Designed by: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Henry N. Cobb, Harry Weese Associates, and WZMH Architects - Sheet2
Fountain Place tower at its prime location ©www.dallasartsdistrict.org
Fountain Place Tower, Designed by: Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Henry N. Cobb, Harry Weese Associates, and WZMH Architects - Sheet3
Distinct facade of the tower ©www.loopnet.com

4. Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Designed by: Nicholas J. Clayton

A brick marvel built in the 19th century, the Cathedral Santuario de la Virgen de Guadalupe is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas, Texas, and is one of the most active cathedrals in the city. The cathedral is reminiscent of the Gothic revival style. 

Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Designed by: Nicholas J. Clayton - Sheet1
Brick composition used extensively in the cathedral  ©commons.wikimedia.org             
Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Designed by: Nicholas J. Clayton - Sheet2
Ornate décor of the cathedral ©www.tripadvisor.es
Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Designed by: Nicholas J. Clayton - Sheet3
Intricately done interior of the cathedral ©www.alquemyenterprises.com.mx

5. Bank of America Plaza, Designed by: JPJ Architects 

Bank of America Plaza, completed in 1985 is a 72-story, 280.7 m late-modernist skyscraper located in the Main Street District in the city’s downtown core in Dallas. The lighted skyscraper is a sight to behold in the night light.

Bank of America Plaza, Designed by: JPJ Architects - Sheet1
LED light accents on the building ©www.reddit.com
Bank of America Plaza, Designed by: JPJ Architects - Sheet2
Visually striking elevation of the plaza ©en.wikipedia.org
Bank of America Plaza, Designed by: JPJ Architects - Sheet3
The Plaza along with the other famous buildings ©www.krcl.com

6. Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Designed by: Architect Thom Mayne

Designed by Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate, Thom Mayne, is a natural history and science museum. The building serves as a vision of sustainability. A 150-foot (45.72 meters) glass-enclosed escalator that extends outside of the building is yet another notable aspect of the building design.

Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Designed by: Architect Thom Mayne - Sheet1
Stone roof of the building ©www.cntraveler.com
Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Designed by: Architect Thom Mayne - Sheet2
The immersive and interactive environment of the museum  ©www.uutours.com
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Large roof sustaining flora ©www.sustainablesites.org

7. Chase Tower, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Also known as the ‘Keyhole building’, the Chase Tower is a symbol of postmodernist architecture. Standing tall at an impressive height of 225 m, the 55 story building has unique architectural features to its credit. The barrel-style roof of the Chase Tower and its postmodern dome are some of its striking features.

Chase Tower, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet1
The striking curved glass top of the Chase Tower ©streamrealty.com
Chase Tower, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet2
6-story hole in the center of the building near the top ©www.philadelphiasign.com
Chase Tower, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet3
Night view of the tower ©lightingdesignalliance.com

8. Dallas Museum of Art, Designed by: Architect Edward Larrabee Barnes

The Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) is located in the Arts District of downtown Dallas. The museum collection is made up of more than 24,000 objects, dating from the third millennium BC to the present day. It is known for its dynamic exhibition policy and educational programs. 

Dallas Museum of Art, Designed by: Architect Edward Larrabee Barnes - Sheet1
Panoramic view of the museum ©artandseek.org
Dallas Museum of Art, Designed by: Architect Edward Larrabee Barnes - Sheet2
View of the courtyard of the museum © blog.dma.org
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Late nights at the museum ©www.dallasobserver.com

9. Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Designed by: Architect I.M. Pei

Revered as one of the world’s greatest orchestra halls, the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center is an epitome of acoustical and architectural design brilliance. With a wide selection of materials employed in the construction of the center, the exterior and interior décor resonates the purpose of the design.

Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Designed by: Architect I.M. Pei - Sheet1
Limestone, wood, marble, and concrete used for construction  ©www.ticketdfw.com
Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Designed by: Architect I.M. Pei - Sheet2
Interior of the concert hall © www.dmagazine.com
Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Designed by: Architect I.M. Pei - Sheet3
The lobby of the center ©www.wikiwand.com

10. Latino Cultural Center, Designed by: Architect Ricardo Legoretta

The Latino Cultural Center is a pivotal regional catalyst in the preservation, development, and promotion of Latino and Hispanic arts and culture. Shining through with its vivid color scheme and solid exteriors, the 27,000 square foot (2,500 m2) facility contains a 300 seat theater, a multi-purpose room, an art gallery, and a sculpture courtyard. 

Latino Cultural Center, Designed by: Architect Ricardo Legoretta - Sheet1
The modernist architecture style of the center ©apaso.org
Latino Cultural Center, Designed by: Architect Ricardo Legoretta - Sheet2
Visual perspectives on display ©land8.com
Latino Cultural Center, Designed by: Architect Ricardo Legoretta - Sheet3
A clean and minimalist design scheme is followed throughout the building ©twitter.com

11. One Main Place, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

One Main Place is a 445 feet (136 m) mixed-use skyscraper, completed in 1968. Built-in Modernist style, the building was the first in Dallas to be fully electric in its operations. Offices, restaurants and hotel services occupy the main functions of the building.

One Main Place, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet1
Striking concrete grid of the facade © dallascityhall.com
One Main Place, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet2
Event pavilion of the hotel at the One Main Place  ©www.dallasnews.com
One Main Place, Designed by: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill - Sheet3
Closeup view of the concrete grid © www.archpaper.com

12. Nasher Sculpture Center, Designed by: Architect Renzo Piano

Designed by world-renowned architect and 1998 Pritzker Prize winner, the Nasher Sculpture Center is a museum that houses the Patsy and Raymond Nasher collection of modern and contemporary sculpture. It is located on 2.4 acres (9,700 m2) to the Dallas Museum of Art.

Nasher Sculpture Center, Designed by: Architect Renzo Piano - Sheet1
Front elevation of the Nasher Sculpture Center  ©www.nashersculpturecenter.org
Nasher Sculpture Center, Designed by: Architect Renzo Piano - Sheet
Sculpture display at the center © assets.bwbx.io
Nasher Sculpture Center, Designed by: Architect Renzo Piano - Sheet3
Newly installed collections at the Nasher Sculpture Center  ©nashersculpture

13. Dallas City Hall, Designed by: Architect I. M. Pei, Architect Theodre Musho

Completed in 1978, the Dallas City Hall features a modernist inverted pyramid design. A buff-colored concrete was chosen for the main building material; its color resembled local earth tones. Having won various prizes for its impressive architectural design, the building has been featured in various movies of the 1980s, notably in the RoboCop movies. 

Dallas City Hall, Designed by: Architect I. M. Pei, Architect Theodre Musho - Sheet1
34-degree slope of the building ©www.dallascitynews.net
Dallas City Hall, Designed by: Architect I. M. Pei, Architect Theodre Musho - Sheet2
Side view of the city hall ©en.wikipedia.org
Dallas City Hall, Designed by: Architect I. M. Pei, Architect Theodre Musho - Sheet3
The buffed concrete finish of the building ©tclf.org

14. Brookhollow Plaza (Currently known as Pegasus Villas), Designed by: Architect Paul Rudolph

Commissioned in 1966, Rudolph’s Brookhollow Plaza was initially conceptualized as a complex of towers but failed to fruition in full. Exposed concrete and steel frames had been used to create this iconic architectural vision. The original structure was recently converted into senior housing and renamed Pegasus Villas. 

Brookhollow Plaza (Currently known as Pegasus Villas), Designed by: Architect Paul Rudolph - Sheet1
64 m high concrete frame of the building ©prudolph.lib.umassd.edu
Brookhollow Plaza (Currently known as Pegasus Villas), Designed by: Architect Paul Rudolph - Sheet2
Tall rectangular arches extend from the rooftop of the building  ©interactives.dallasnews.com
Brookhollow Plaza (Currently known as Pegasus Villas), Designed by: Architect Paul Rudolph - Sheet3
Concrete rich textures of the walls of the building  ©interactives.dallasnews.com

15. Kalita Humphreys Theater, Designed by: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright

Completed in 1959, the historic building is the only theater designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and one of the last completed buildings he designed. Based on his principle of organic architecture, everything in the theater is at a 30/60 degree angle. The theater is occupied throughout the year.

Kalita Humphreys Theater, Designed by: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright - Sheet1
The organic form of the structure ©www.pinterest.com
Kalita Humphreys Theater, Designed by: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright - Sheet2
Inside of the theater ©twitter.com
Kalita Humphreys Theater, Designed by: Architect Frank Lloyd Wright - Sheet3
Street view of the theater ©www.aiadallas.org
Meenu Kadalassery
Author

Architecture graduate, currently working in the field of architectural design. A passionate writer and a simple human being on a soulful journey of self exploration.

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