Led by principal James Garland AIA, Fluidity Design Consultants was founded in 2002 in Los Angeles. The firm is known for their leading work in water feature design and engineering. FDC’s work has gained recognition internationally through numerous awards, competition wins, and publications. The firm also collaborates with other leading architects, landscape architects, institutions and developers in the realization of water features in significant public places.

The following is a list of 15 projects by the firm, Fluidity Design Consultants.

1. Grand Park, Los Angeles

Designed by Rios Clemente Hale, the Grand Park at Los Angeles revitalizes four blocks of public area from Los Angeles’ hall to its Music Center. Its west section incorporates a historic fountain, reconditioned by FDC and expanded to incorporate an interactive water play court.

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View of the Grand Park, Source – Jim Simmons for FDC
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View of the Grand Park, Source – Jim Simmons for FDC
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Aerial View of the Grand Park, Source – Archpaper
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View of fountains at the Grand Park, Source – WhiskeyMoss WordPress

2. Hearst Headquarters, New York

The Hearst Tower or Headquarters is a collaborative project by FDC, Foster & Partners, James Carpenter Design Associates, Adamson Architects and Tishman Speyer Properties.

The role of the consultants in this project establishes an exemplary entry by means of a glass cascade that is transected by diagonal escalators. The acoustic presence of the installation is modulated by the transforming flow of the cascade feature.

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Interior View of the Hearst Headquartere, Source – Chuck Choi FDC
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Interior View of the Hearst Headquartere, Source – Divisare
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Interior View of the Hearst Headquartere, Source – Chuck Choi FDC
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View of the lobby glass cascape, Source – NYC Architecture

3. Devon Energy, Okhlahoma CIty

Devon Energy engineered a premiere new headquarters in capital of Oklahoma. Fludity Design Consultants designed 3 water features as part of this project – crescent reflective pools in the interior and exterior, and in the outdoor courtyard, granite plinths coated in water.

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Exterior pool at Devon Energy, Source – FDC
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Interior feature at Devon Energy, Source – FDC
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Granite water plinths at Devon Energy, Source – FDC
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Interior feature at Devon Energy, Source – FDC

4. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Costa Meca CA

The fountain feature designed by FDC is located adjacent to Segerston Hall’s new Jullianne and George Argros Plaza and comprises a sculptural, infinity edge pool supporting four, large-scale curving jets. The fountain jets are square measure positioned to counsel Calder’s ‘stabile’ sculptures with the bespoke large-circumference jets providing robust, arcing shapes within the air. At night, the fountain is lights up in a plethora of colours enabled by LEDs.

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View of the Fountain at the plaza, Source – Stone World Magazine
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View of the centre at night, Source – OC Register
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View of the Fountain at the plaza, Source – Stone World Magazine
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View of the Fountain at the plaza, Source – FDC

5. JingAn Kerry Centre, Shanghai China

The plaza at the JingAn Kerry Centre in Shanghai lies adjacent to the historic Mao House. The feature/installation by FDC attempts to activate this space comprises rectilinear ‘boxes’ of vertical jets that emerge from the paving in organized, nested figures. The mathematics and formal geometry of the jets references the encircling architecture as well as ancient vernacular Chinese garden layouts.

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View of feature at the centre at night, Source – FDC
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View of the JingAn Centre, Source – KPF
JingAn Kerry Centre -3
View of feature at the centre at night, Source – LILA
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Srishti
Author

Srishti Currently in her final year of architecture school, Srishti loves to question and curate her own set of visual responses to everything she sees around in the built environment. She aspires to be able to create minimal design interventions that are a result of extensive user-based research in the public realm.

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