Fernando Mastrangelo, Known for peculiar designs of furniture, sculptures, experiential installations, and interior design, Fernando Mastrangelo is a Brooklyn-based contemporary artist sculpting most of his works by hand. Experimenting with unusual materials like salt, sugar, and coffee beans as raw material for interior sculptures and furniture and the use of materials such as hand-dyed sand, concrete, recycled plastic, and powdered glass complements his concerns with ecological issues and sustainability. Exotic landscapes experienced during his many trips around the world influence Mastrangelo’s works. He references the cultural and geographical identities of the places that influence his work through metaphors. Abstract depictions of the effects of global warming engage the audience through his art.

Below is the list of 10 Projects by Fernando Mastrangelo:

1. Audemars Piguet | Fernando Mastrangelo

The Audemars Piguet booth at the Art Basel 2019 conceptualizes the Vallée De Joux in the Swiss Jura Mountains, the company’s base since 1875, through sculptural design with seamless tones and textures. Fernando cast crushed boulders from Vallée De Joux into walls, furniture, and display cases inspired by its natural landforms. Central sand and silica-molded sculptural forest, with abstract spruce trees, showcases the brand’s latest collection.

Audemars Piguet - Sheet7
Audemars Piguet ©coolhunting.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet6
Audemars Piguet ©coolhunting.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet5
Audemars Piguet ©www.designboom.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet4
Audemars Piguet ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet3
Audemars Piguet ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet2
Audemars Piguet ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Audemars Piguet - Sheet1
Audemars Piguet ©fernandomastrangelo.com

 2. Avra

A delicately carved wall sculpture weighing about 1360 kilos displayed in an authentic Greek restaurant, Avra Madison near Central Park, NYC. Brought about by hand-dyed cement and salt, tightly layered, hints of the sea. The rough undulating edges press further into the natural state of the sculpture.

Avra - Sheet3
Avra ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Avra - Sheet2
Avra ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Avra - Sheet1
Avra ©fernandomastrangelo.com

3. Drift Series | Fernando Mastrangelo

Contrast again becomes a focus in this collection of sculptural furniture inspired by extraordinary natural earth formations sparked during Mastrangelo’s journeys to the Grand Canyon and Patagonia. A mixture of meticulously polished elements merging into more uncontrolled textures; the gradient palette of the six pieces refers to the endless horizons with hand-dyed sand, powdered glass, mirror, and cement. The showstopper of the collection is the sofa, which is a rough concrete sculpture contrasted by the grey silk velvet upholstery.

Drift Series - Sheet5
Drift Sofa ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Drift Series - Sheet4
Drift Sofa ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Drift Series - Sheet3
Drift Sofa ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Drift Series - Sheet2
Drift Sofa ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Drift Series - Sheet1
Drift Sofa ©fernandomastrangelo.com

4. Escape Series

Furniture as escapism; a collection that expresses a three-dimensional abstract painting depicting water, hills, and skies, on seamless curving surfaces. Made with hand-dyed granules of sand, powdered glass, silica, and coffee, Mastrangelo’s trips to the American Southwest inspire the collection.

Escape Series - Sheet8
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet7
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet6
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet5
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet4
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet3
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet2
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Escape Series - Sheet1
Escape ©fernandomastrangelo.com

5. Rebecca Taylor | Fernando Mastrangelo

The Rebecca Taylor store in Dallas showcases the sculptural displays matching the crystallized pink salt rock and cement wall, made of hand-dyed sand and powdered glass. A neutral yet playful color palette embraces the brand’s signature color and evokes a feminine aesthetic. Colors blend into the walls, floor, and displays providing a subtle backdrop for the subtle designs of Rebecca Taylor.

Rebecca Taylor - Sheet3
Rebecca Taylor ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Rebecca Taylor - Sheet2
Rebecca Taylor ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Rebecca Taylor - Sheet1
Rebecca Taylor ©fernandomastrangelo.com

6. Felix

A life-size sculpture of a coca farmer made with USD 70,000 worth of cocaine as the primary material. Binding cocaine with epoxy made the sculpture, mounted on a mirror base, inedible. The sculpture discusses the secret economy prevailing from the production to consumption of a product that implies luxury and yet made by impecunious farmers.

Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Felix ©wmiasto.pl
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Felix ©charestweinberg.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Felix ©charestweinberg.com

7. Spiral | Fernando Mastrangelo

In 2014, a local collector commissioned SPIRAL, a 50 feet wall sculpture, to be the pièce de résistance of his townhouse in the West Village. The piece rhythmically “spins” to music owing to an integrated light and sound component. Composed of salt and fiberglass, it displays the same form in both the positive and the negative. It sits next to a fireplace and almost covers two storeys in height.

Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Spiral ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Spiral ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Spiral ©fernandomastrangelo.com

8. Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney, a fashion brand known for their sustainability commitments through their products and their stores, enlisted Fernando to create sculptural consoles and sofa with organic elements to complement their eco-friendly store in Palo Alto. A contrast, clear in the design, shows the jagged minerals forming a natural texture inside, packed with a smooth box of white cement on the outside. The exterior is hand-dyed cement contrasting with the rock salt composition of the inside. To end it, the floor tiles are hand-cast cement that carries the concept throughout the store.

Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Stella Mccartney ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Stella Mccartney ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Stella Mccartney ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Stella Mccartney ©fernandomastrangelo.com

9. Thakoon

In collaboration with SHoP Architects, Mastrangelo creates the first retail store of the Thai-American fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul in New York’s SoHo District. Mastrangelo cast the walls on-site in his signature striated effect seen in his furniture. The concrete used to create seamless curved walls and furniture, layering the concrete in small batches, gives a sense of seductive movement throughout. The total of 1400 square feet of cast cement took over 3000 hours to complete.

Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©www.shoparc.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©www.shawmut.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©www.frameweb.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©www.dezeen.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Thakoon ©fernandomastrangelo.com

10. Tiny House | Fernando Mastrangelo

Part of NYCxDESIGN, New York’s design week, the Tiny House exemplifies sustainability through design and the use of discarded plastic. This rendition of a future house uses recycled glass, sand, and plastic. A hugely collaborative effort, this installation’s interiors feature responsive scent and sound that changes as the visitors move through. It also houses a courtyard concept, all the while incorporating Fernando’s signature cement casting techniques.

Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©fernandomastrangelo.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©www.archdaily.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©www.archdaily.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©www.archdaily.com
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Fernando Mastrangelo-10 Iconic Projects
Tiny House ©www.archdaily.com

After shooting to fame over controversial installations like “Felix”, which caught the eye of the D.E.A., for using cocaine as the base material, and “La Salvamara” for using the human ashes of slain MS 13 gang members as raw material, Mastrangelo still isn’t shy of making bold (political) statements, but he is more aware of their interpretation. In Mastrangelo’s words, “In my work Felix, I am discussing the powerful secret economy of illegal drugs, from production to consumption, and the antagonisms implicit in this trajectory.” After having seen the Tiny House’s facade made of discarded plastic, you can expect to find his future works to grow out of something that you very well may have thrown out.

 

Author

Sahil Tanveer is an architect and thinker, who runs a cosmopolitan Architecture studio with work across the country. He believes architecture is all-inclusive and personal. He is continually in search of the unknown, while observing psychology, philosophy, and the influence of culture and society on architecture and design.

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