Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter is a design firm founded in Copenhagen in 1985 by the architects BojeLundgaard and LeneTranberg. The company’s field of activity is development projects, building designs, urban planning, landscape planning, and product design. They work with both new buildings and renovation projects. Their mission is to create spaces that will be beneficial for individuals’ lives or communities uniquely and innovatively. With their core values of humanism, simplification, and craftsmanship, they follow Nordic architecture’s values. Since they adopt a forward-looking approach in architecture, they never separate sustainability from their designs. The firm mainly works with projects in Denmark and the nearby region, including other Nordic countries.

Below is the list of 15 Projects by Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter:

1. Niagara

Niagara is a new research and teaching facility for Malmö University. The complex comprises seven, nine, and thirteen story’s building volumes, and merge to serve as a whole. The surrounding building’s heights inspired the idea of designing buildings’ heights to be differently. Not only was the building balancing the neighborhood silhouette, but it also creates a sculptural effect by curved shapes and rounded corners. 

Niagara - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Niagara - Sheet2
©Kristian Adolfsson
Niagara - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

2. Havneholmen

The project is located inHavneholmen, an industrial district, and with availing commercial harbor, proposes a housing complex. The plan indicates two U shaped blocks with inner courts. Each court opens up to the pier and has a promenade that reinforces the connection between port and city. Buildings are at different heights to reduce the solid appearance of the complex. On the facade, white thermal plaster unifies with bay windows and balconies and resembles a summer house.

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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

3. Ofelia Square

Ofelia Square is an urban space in Copenhagen’s heart and provides a community space to meet and interact with the harbor. The designed pier creates a soft transition from the historic surroundings to the ocean. Its large-scale does not limit the activities and leaves it to the user’s imagination. There is a pavilion sequence on the pier to facilitate a café, descent to underground parking, ticket sales, restrooms, and a stage tower for outdoor performances.

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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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An installation placed on the pier. ©www.theculturetrip.com

4. Helsingør Wastewater Treatment Plant

The project was designed after a request that requires an expansion and renovation of an older facility. The site plan was determined by existing basins and the new building placed along the converging rail lines. Between the basins and the building, there is a service road that has access to all operations. The administration building is set where the basins and the building joins on the terrain. A bastion wall functions as a composition organizer for the entire complex and provides an engagement between sloping terrain and the facilities. 

Helsingør Wastewater Treatment Plant - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Helsingør Wastewater Treatment Plant - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Helsingør Wastewater Treatment Plant - Sheet3
Interior of Administration Building ©www.ltarkitekter.dk

5. Rungsted

The project contains an expansion for a news conference section and a new hotel wing. It also remakes the facility’s arrival area and suggests some arrangements to enhance the complex circulation. In the site plan, the hotel wing was positioned separately from the rest of the facility. The slight bend from both sides towards nature creates an effect like the building embraces the environment. It is connected to the other buildings with a tunnel. Also, the new conference hall has a connection with the existing buildings above ground level. It is a more coherent extension in terms of building shape and circulation compared with the hotel wing.

Rungsted - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

6. Tietgen Dormitory

Tietgen Dormitory is located nearby Copenhagen university. The building’s circular shape contributes to its reputation as an architectural icon in the new settlement and provides a function that connects the surroundings. The circular architecture responds to the urban context and prepares a plan with a meaningful interior. While rooms are placed on the outer perimeter of the circle, common areas are placed inside. It enables the structure to bring the individual and the collective together from the outside to the inside; constitutes the building’s essential concept.

Tietgen Dormitory - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Tietgen Dormitory - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Tietgen Dormitory - Sheet3
©Jehns M. Lindhe

7. The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse is a residential building located in nearby Copenhagen’s free port, a newly developing settlement dominated by historical warehouses. The residences benefit from the port view and are preserved from heavy traffic and other industrial facilities. The building’s sculptural effect is provided by bay windows, balconies, and some subtractions from the form, and this effect becomes more apparent with the sun and weather conditions.

The Lighthouse - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Lighthouse - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Lighthouse - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

8. Szene

Szene is a chair design for an auditorium in Axel Towers and created by a collaboration with Engelbrechts design company. Axel Tower’s organic shape appears in the auditorium layout, too. Therefore, Engelbrechts, the client, needed a unique chair design that corresponds to the space’s semicircular architecture. The design traces the auditorium’s contour lines and leaves room for smooth movements in the area. The chair’s organic shape harmonizes with the human body and provides a comfortable and elegant sitting experience.

Szene - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Szene - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

9. Pier47

Pier47 is the last building of a sequence of buildings and has 650 workstations as a corporate domicile. 

Window openings differ from each other with the same scale and create a facade that prevents distinguishing a modular structure behind the building’s exterior. The differently sized windows provide a spectacular view from every side of the office space, decrease the typically formal atmosphere of office spaces, and bring a playful aura. In the planning, the building has an atrium throughout seven stories, functions as a visual space, guidance, and sun distributor to the inside of the building. The sun reaches the building generously from the windows. Air conditioning is based on passive systems and active systems that are more energy-efficient than traditional methods. 

Pier47 - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

10. The Royal Danish Playhouse

The Royal Danish Playhouse is located between two historic urban areas and looks towards the harbor. The concept is inspired by surrounding buildings and their proportions in urban tissue, and the playhouse acts as a whole attraction point. The oak board promenade, which surrounds the playhouse from three sides, connects the city, the playhouse, and the harbor. The stage building is covered with glass and contains theatres and auditoriums. Rustic brickwork and copper coated fly tower contrasts with stage building while referencing the historic environment. This building also uses innovative energy systems such as using seawater for cooling and reusing the audience’s heat.   

The Royal Danish Playhouse - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Royal Danish Playhouse - Sheet2
©David Borland
The Royal Danish Playhouse - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Royal Danish Playhouse - Sheet4
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

11. Charlottetårnet

Charlottetårnet combines the traditional townhouse with a 16-story height building that is not common in the building’s location. Charlottetårnet’s primary concept is to create shared spaces to be lived in. Its long and narrow shape only covers 126 square meters, relatively little space for a hotel building. Every floor consists of only two hotel rooms, and each room has a fascinating view. The fifth and sixteenth floors are planned as communal rooftop patios that create a commercial and social landmark. Building’s small footprint made it challenging to fit in low energy standards; however, it was solved by combining innovative active systems with natural ventilation. The building’s energy concept was figured together with the building’s design process. 

Charlottetårnet - Sheet1
©Leif Jørgensen
Charlottetårnet - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

12. Natural History Museum of Denmark

The Natural History Museum of Denmark is planned to serve as an extension to The Sølvtorv complex. The extension will consist of exhibition spaces and storage rooms for extensive collections, and it is mainly designed as an underground facility. Historical complex is organized for the museum’s administration, teaching and research. A transparent building will be constructed to connect the historical area to the new museum. It is going to have an intuitive connection with the underground structure; the exhibitions will be accessible for people coming from the garden or the city. The whale-hall towers are positioned between smaller buildings to become visible from a distance; thus, it can be a city landmark. The project determines Preserved Botanical Garden as a leading figure. Since the new museum is planned as an underground structure with some modest exteriors outside, it does not compete with the historical environment, just balances and harmonizes. The construction of the building started in 2019 and is estimated to finish by 2023.

Natural History Museum of Denmark - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk
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©www.ltarkitekter.dk

13. Kannikegården

Kannikegårdenis located in Denmark’s oldest town, and it consists of functions as both a parish hall and a workplace. The building is raised with concrete columns, built on the ruins, and the bottom of the building is covered by glass. Kannikegårdenis located in the church square. Hence, its location makes the ruins accessible to city residents and visitors. The upper part’s cladding is made custom-made, reddish-brown tiles as a modern interpretation of medieval bricks. Small window opening balances a solid-looking façade and creates a home atmosphere for the church staff.

Kannikegården - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Kannikegården - Sheet2
©www.archdaily.com
Kannikegården - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Kannikegården - Sheet4
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

14. Danske Banks Headquarters

Danske Bank’s new headquarters, which has been in service for more than 140 years, is designed as a modern company. It proposes a non-hierarchical organization and focuses on innovation, accessibility, and cooperation. The building also intends to connect the Postbyen, which is a new settlement for housing and commercial space, with the rest of Copenhagen. The brick cladding references the traditional Copenhagen architecture and combines it with a modern design. Since the lower floors are accessible to the public access, larger openings on the facade’s bottom are planned to create a visual invitation for the customers and attract and retain talented employees. The building’s construction is estimated to finish by March 2023.

Danske Banks Headquarters - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Danske Banks Headquarters - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
Danske Banks Headquarters - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

15. The Danish Castle Centre

The project is creating a new exhibition center for The Danish Castle Centre. It is built on top of the well-preserved castle ruins. The museum has a rust-colored steel façade to match the other buildings on site. Therefore, the building does not stand forward and leaves the leading role to the castle’s ruins. The building’s shape is determined by the preservation requirements and the existing topography, and it is looking like it is rising from the terrain.

The Danish Castle Centre - Sheet1
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Danish Castle Centre - Sheet2
©www.ltarkitekter.dk
The Danish Castle Centre - Sheet3
©www.ltarkitekter.dk

References:

Author

MügeElmas is currently an architecture student studying at Ozyegin University, Istanbul, in the senior year. After graduation, she aspires to continue her masters. She is interested in all forms of art, but is specifically passionate about movies and set designs, and always seeks new experiences to widen her knowledge about art and architecture.

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