Architects have a versatile character (or in the process of becoming an architect they attain versatility) and so do their interests. Many architects thrive in allied realms of the design industry, be it product design, set design, graphic design, fashion design, etc. Specifically, when a product that is considered to be a part of the AEC industry as the lighting fixtures, and furniture, it makes it feels more connected to know how the designer (may it be an interior designer or the architect) wants a product that is both user friendly and helps in organizing the space. So, designing one for their own and making it available for the rest of the world makes more sense. This article is about one such collaboration of renowned architect Bjarke Ingels and a renowned illumination company Artemide

Vine Light for Artemide designed by Bjarke Ingels looks like a doodle - Sheet1
vine light_artemide.com

Who are Artemide? 

Artemide is a world-renowned company that focuses on lighting products ardently following the philosophy called “The human light”, was founded in the year 1960 by Ernesto Gismondi. Artemide is based out in Italy. This brand has a team of R&D which makes their works unique hitherto. Artemide comes up with lighting solutions to the minuscule problems that are overlooked by other brands along with creativity. Apart from the fabrication and research they do collaborate with designers around the world to come up with innovations in light. Architects like Bjarke Ingels, Herzog & De Meuron, Vico Magistretti, Michele De Lucchi, and Giancarlo Fassina, do workshops in design schools to identify talents.  Artemide architectural division was created in the year 1997. 2000 is the year when the LED revolution took place in the company. One will be fascinated to check out what innovations they are creating in the field of lighting.  

Vine Light for Artemide designed by Bjarke Ingels looks like a doodle - Sheet2
founder of artemide mr.Ernesto Gismondi_artemide.com

Artemide and Bjarke Ingels 

Bjarke Ingels – a revolutionary name of the decade. An architect who has reached the summit and has gained recognition for his work at a young age (which is very rare in the field of architecture). Though Bjarke Ingels has focused on things like sustainability, and innovation he also does have a unique style of giving form to his structures. His projects with Artemide are no less and aren’t devoid of his signature styles in architecture. This collaboration of Artemide with BIG has brought a new definition to the lights that are available in the market. Light is one crucial part of designing spaces, be it natural or artificial. When utilized right they enhance the living atmosphere making it suitable to the motive of the space.  

Vine Light for Artemide designed by Bjarke Ingels looks like a doodle - Sheet3
Bjarke Ingels and team_artemide.com

Alphabet of light – this is one such unique project of literally replicating the alphabets. They have a set of modules that can be combined to shape the letters wanted. The light emitted does not cause glare, keeping the place comfortable at the illumination level. The parts are linked using an electromagnet that makes the light continuous thus avoiding wastage of light spill which causes no glare.  

Alphabet of light circular, the alphabet of light linear, the alphabet of light system, the alphabet of light outdoor, gople, la linea, ripple, gople system, gople outdoor, gople portable, vine light, stellar nebula, slicing are the projects designed by BIG for Artemide. 

Vine Light for Artemide designed by Bjarke Ingels looks like a doodle - Sheet4
alphabet of light designed by BIG_artemide.com

Vine Light Designed by Bjarke Ingels & team 

Vine light – a minimalistic design concept of lighting that is flexible to the user’s comfort, simple, and elegant. This lighting design by Bjarke Ingels was the highlight of Milan design week 2018. Vine light comprises two incomplete circles, one acting as the light source and the other being the base of the stand. Vine light is designed in a manner that they do not cast shadows. It can be mounted on the floor, table and wall according to the need. Length ranges from 36 cm to 184 cm and height can be adjusted between 12 cm to 200 cm.

Vine Light for Artemide designed by Bjarke Ingels looks like a doodle - Sheet5
all typology of fixable vine light_artemide.com

The design seems to be like a doodle, it also does create an image of a shank that is flanked by circular hooks on either side, it portrays anything but a conventional lighting object. The central pipe that houses the wires and essentials for it to function is 16mm in diameter. It consists of two joints for better flexibility and functionality. In succession to this light was a linear light, which was released previously in the same year was also designed by Bjarke Ingels and the team.

vine light floor mounted_artemide.com

Minimalism and simplicity are slowly becoming the trend of the era. These are the concepts that people of all industries should be working on apart from sustainability. As these lend a helping hand to make the world sustainable by breaking the myth of luxury being grandeur. Designing minimal and simple is a lot more challenging than complex designs. The design languages are slowly getting redefined. As people are becoming aware of the needs and changes that have to be made for the world to survive and prosper for the upcoming generations to enjoy the fruits of the labor that the world is acting on now. But these concepts reach only half of the population. It is only when such concepts reach the masses could we see the change that we dream to happen. 

References:

Anon, (n.d.). Available at: https://www.artemide.com/en/subfamily/4746415/vine-light?series=4.

‌Anon, (n.d.). Available at: https://www.artemide.com/en/company/identity.

‌Anon, (n.d.). Available at: https://www.designboom.com/design/big-bjarke-ingels-artemide-alphabet-of-lights-milan-design-week-04-21-2016/.

‌Anon, (n.d.). Available at: https://www.artemide.com/en/company/designers/3398000/big-bjarke-ingels-group.

Author

Stephy is an intrigued explorer of various paradigms of Architecture, choosing writing as a catharsis to her never ending thoughts.

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