Out in the land down under, a group of architects is sensitizing the architectural paradigm with their projects that invariably prioritize clients and their communities. Based in Perth, this multidisciplinary architecture firm has worked on plenty of large scale projects- from urban and infrastructure proposals to residential and private sector developments. Since their establishment in 1993, they have collaborated with local and state governments departments of Western Australia on various projects, earning them a unique understanding of dealing with public buildings that cater to the disabled as well as overseeing regional projects in remote locations. MPS Architects are an inquisitive team, passionate about exceptional design and aesthetic innovation, and their work seems to say the same:

1. Curtin University Bus Station

The Curtin University Bus Station is one of the busiest in Perth, receiving nine different Transperth services every day. One of MPS Architects’ major transportation infrastructure projects, this project dealt with the development of the new bus station along with an urban plan that blended into the university’s masterplan. The bus station offers transparency, weather protection, durability, and optimal vehicle operation, all while maintaining sensitivity to its surroundings. The station composes the focal point of a planned innovation hub, complementing the proposed recreational facilities, retail outlets, and public spaces while connecting the university with the Perth CBD.

Curtin University Bus Station - Sheet3
©perthnow.com.au
Curtin University Bus Station - Sheet2
©curtin.edu.au
Curtin University Bus Station - Sheet1
©com.au

2. Tambrey Early Childhood Learning Center

In partnership with the Federal Government and local industry, the learning center was designed to address the need for child care support and support families. The center accommodates 120 children in Karratha, a remote city in Western Australia. The building was constructed on the site of a local school to allow an easy transition from daycare to primary school, convenient for parents who otherwise had to drop kids off at different locations. The building was designed to keep Karratha’s hot and dry climate in mind, resulting in a compact design plan, thermal insulation, daylight strategies, and passive solar principles. The structure is composed of steel frame construction with composite panel exterior cladding on a concrete slab- this kept maintenance issues on a low while handling this remote undertaking. The center provides a safe and nurturing environment for children as young as five years old, with space for future expansion based on the needs of the community.

Tambrey Early Childhood Learning Center - Sheet2
 ©www.ymcawa.org.au
Tambrey Early Childhood Learning Center - Sheet3
 ©www.ymcawa.org.au
Tambrey Early Childhood Learning Center - Sheet1
 ©www.ymcawa.org.au

3. Noongar Alcohol & Substance Abuse Services (N.A.S.A.’.S)

Intending to create a facility that could foster a safe, welcoming, and cultural response, MPS Architects created a place for healing for Aboriginal people struggling with alcohol and substance abuse. The project emphasized developing an inviting and holistic aesthetic for the building and blending it into the existing landscape. Low, long lines created an unimposing and calming face. The central foyer served as a focal meeting place, creating a central axis that aligned with several large trees which held cultural significance to the Noongar people. The extravagant height of the foyer and the fully glazed walls extended nature into the interior spaces as well. The design carefully incorporates northern light to most parts of the building, reducing the heat load in the summers and increasing sun penetration during the winters.

Noongar Alcohol & Substance Abuse Services (N.A.S.A.'.S) - Sheet3
©wungening.com.au
Noongar Alcohol & Substance Abuse Services (N.A.S.A.'.S) - Sheet2
©com.au
Noongar Alcohol & Substance Abuse Services (N.A.S.A.'.S) - Sheet1
©com.au

4. Leonora Community Health Clinic

This purpose-built complex contains a blend of health-related services catering to the local indigenous community. MPS Architects conducted extensive consultation and discussions with the local community to create a place that was eagerly accepted by them. The facility was developed to support a range of services within the same complex while considering the wishes and needs of the client and the local community. Leonora is accustomed to an arid climate, resulting in the design for natural lighting and reduced reliance on artificial heating and cooling to combat the hot and dry conditions.

Leonora Community Health Clinic - Sheet3
 ©mpsarch.com.au
Leonora Community Health Clinic - Sheet2
 ©mpsarch.com.au
Leonora Community Health Clinic - Sheet1
 ©mpsarch.com.au

5. Armadale Station

In 2006, the Armadale Railway Station was rebuilt to revitalize the transport precinct of the city and the urban fabric. MPS Architects arrived at a design that complements the local architecture while remaining contemporary and relevant to its function. The new station aimed to create a positive design and aesthetic initiative that reconstructs the community perception of the city center. It was built to cater to the thousands of daily passengers and to include a new civic space, office facilities, and provision for future retail and commercial developments. The use of robust and durable materials gave the station an attractive look while curbing the frequent acts of vandalism. The design strongly reflects the openness of the city’s character.

Armadale Station - Sheet5
©com.au
Armadale Station - Sheet4
©mra.wa.gov.au
Armadale Station - Sheet3
©com.au
Armadale Station - Sheet2
©com.au
Armadale Station - Sheet1
©mra.wa.gov.au

6. Murdoch Rail Station

MPS Architects was responsible for the design, development, and construction of several stations along the Perth Southern Rail line- Murdoch Station being one of them. This station is located on the Mandurah line, serving the suburb of Murdoch. Additionally, it features integrated bus services on the concourse level which operates as a bus station. The team aimed at maximizing the value of money while considering the long-term needs of the local community.

Murdoch Rail Station - Sheet4
 ©en.wikipedia.org
Murdoch Rail Station - Sheet3
 ©en.wikipedia.org
Murdoch Rail Station - Sheet2
 ©en.wikipedia.org
Murdoch Rail Station - Sheet1
 ©en.wikipedia.org

6. Wellard Rail Station

Another one of MPS Architects’ marks on the rail is the Wellard Rail Station of the Transperth network, serving the suburb of Wellard. The station is situated at the core of a transit-oriented development scheme called The Village at Wellard. The design integrates parks, walkability, and rail proximity, acquiring plenty of awards from local institutes and corporations. The development contains low and medium density residential projects punctured with parkland and conservation areas. The firm paid special attention to manage and maintain rail, public, and contractor safety throughout the construction.

Wellard Rail Station - Sheet6
©peet.com.au
Wellard Rail Station - Sheet5
©peet.com.au
Wellard Rail Station - Sheet4
©peet.com.au
Wellard Rail Station - Sheet3
©peet.com.au
Wellard Rail Station - Sheet2
©peet.com.au
Wellard Rail Station - Sheet1
©com.au

8. Kwinana Rail Station

Kwinana Rail Station is a good example of the high levels of urban design that MPS Architects dealt with during the development of the stations along the Perth Southern Rail line. This station serves the suburb of The Spectacles. A challenge that was duly faced was to minimize ongoing maintenance costs by the careful selection of materials and design initiatives. Along with the station, unique and functional structures were incorporated to fit into the urban fabric

Kwinana Rail Station - Sheet3
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Kwinana Rail Station - Sheet2
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Kwinana Rail Station - Sheet1
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au

9. Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University

Buildings 303-304 was originally built in the late 1960s which featured the Chemistry lab of Curtin University. The goal of this refurbishment project was to modernize the existing structures by converting the bleak lab spaces into comfortable and state-of-the-art teaching hubs. Universal access was a major concern of the design to ensure inclusive environments for the students. The project featured the installation of a new glass-paneled elevator along with a series of ramps and covered elevated walkways. MPS Architects included technology installations and updates like a centrally accessible AV network with a perimeter of data points, electronic lecterns, and data projectors to enhance the design. Buildings 303-304 now contain multiple teaching spaces, one of the three campus computer labs, the Career Center, and the Student and Community Development office.

Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet6
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet5
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet4
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet3
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet2
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au
Refurbishment of Buildings 303-304 of Curtin University - Sheet1
 ©www.doricgroup.com.au

10. Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University

The Biomedical and Biomolecular Research precinct is a vibrant part of the busy campus of Curtin University and harbors hundreds of students and staff. The refurbishment of this building sought to gain back some beneficial teaching space while grouping similar disciplines in a centralized location. The basic enclosure of Building 305 was left untouched, only to entirely remodel the interior spaces. An additional floor was added and this demanded that a new roof be constructed as well. The aim to create an integrated multi-purpose space primarily for the students of Health Sciences saw an extensive fit-out of new research labs, offices, and work areas.

Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University - Sheet5
©com.au
Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University - Sheet4
©com.au
Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University - Sheet3
©com.au
Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University - Sheet2
©com.au
Refurbishment of Building 305 of Curtin University - Sheet1
©petaannephotography.com
Ankitha Gattupalli
Author

Ankitha is an explorative student passionate about architecture, urbanism, and ecology. A creative junkie- she loves to express herself through music, design, and written reflections. She believes that architects are conscious observers of the world, translating their needs into tangible forms.

Write A Comment