The new modern minimalism in Architecture has been exploring the vastness of the liminal. One such example of rare modern monolithic architecture is Bunker Architecture. A bunker is an underground military defensive fortification designed to protect people from flying bombs and other violent catastrophes. The sheer purpose of protection, the bunkers were devoid of any style, it becomes a ghost-modern architecture with haunting memories of tragic happenings in the past, also the aesthetic simplicity of the idea of the structures. With renewed interest in Brutalism, many designers took the concept of Bunker Architecture to explore the emotive minimalism of the style. Many modernist architects started exploring the concept of bunker Architecture with various designs of their own.

1. A Safe House, Ukraineby Sergey Makhno Architects Designs

Sergey Makhno Architects recently revealed the plans of Underground House Plan B in a Ukrainian forest. It features a large helipad to offer a sculpture with no sign of private residence. It is spread in 2,280 sq. m and 15m below depth. The house is envisioned as an autonomous house and features all amenities and comfort of all living spaces.

A Safe House, Ukraineby Sergey Makhno Architects Designs - Sheet1
Safe House ©worldarchitecture.org
A Safe House, Ukraineby Sergey Makhno Architects Designs - Sheet2
Safe House ©worldarchitecture.org
A Safe House, Ukraineby Sergey Makhno Architects Designs - Sheet3
Safe House ©worldarchitecture.org
A Safe House, Ukraineby Sergey Makhno Architects Designs - Sheet4
Safe House ©worldarchitecture.org

2. Blåvand Bunker museum, Denmarkby BIG & Varde

In 2017, BIG architects completed the design of a Bunker museum and cultural center to create a dynamic dialogue between the old and the new. The rational and sensitive approach to the design can be seen with transparency and balance between the natural and the artificial. The structure is made of RCC with large slabs tilted to not shadow the natural surrounding dunes.

Blåvand Bunker museum, Denmarkby BIG & Varde - Sheet1
Blavand Bunker museum ©archdaily.com
Blåvand Bunker museum, Denmarkby BIG & Varde - Sheet2
Blavand Bunker museum ©archdaily.com
Blåvand Bunker museum, Denmarkby BIG & Varde - Sheet3
Blavand Bunker museum © archdaily.com

3. Bunker 599by RAAAF & Atelier de Lyon

Bunker 599 is a radical intervention of Dutch cultural heritage to shed new light and to make people look at their surroundings in a new way. The indestructible bunker with monumental status is sliced open and a wooden boardwalk cuts through the heavy construction. It provides a footpath to a nearby floodplain and natural reserve.

Bunker 599by RAAAF & Atelier de Lyon
Bunker 599 ©archdaily.com

4. Kamiuma House, Tokyoby Chop + Archi

Japanese architecture studio Chop + Archi designed a house using a trio of courtyards and the sharpest dead space corners in a triangular plot in Tokyo. The house offers plenty of privacy and control of the levels of strong sunlight. Daylight is brought in through voids carved in the corners of the house.

Kamiuma House, Tokyoby Chop + Archi - Sheet1
Kamiuma House ©archdaily.com
Kamiuma House, Tokyoby Chop + Archi - Sheet2
Kamiuma House ©archdaily.com
Kamiuma House, Tokyoby Chop + Archi - Sheet3
Kamiuma House ©archdaily.com

5. Peace and the Culture Bunker, Seoul by CoRe Architects

South Korean studio CoRe Architects transformed a 1970 built military bunker into a creative hub for the local community of Seoul. The 250m extended bunker follows a 20m tall observation tower which was designed to provide visitors with a view across the park axis.

Peace and the Culture Bunker, Seoul by CoRe Architects - Sheet1
Peace and the culture bunker ©dezeen.com
Peace and the Culture Bunker, Seoul by CoRe Architects - Sheet2
Peace and the culture bunker ©dezeen.com
Peace and the Culture Bunker, Seoul by CoRe Architects - Sheet3
Peace and the culture bunker ©dezeen.com

6. House in Toyonaka, Osakaby FujiwaraMuro Architects

Japanese studio FujiwaraMuro Architects designed House in Toyonaka, Osaka, as a series of offset boxes with gaps to allow light and ventilation, while maintaining the occupant’s privacy. Space seems closed off to the outside world and yet provides a beautiful space with minimalism.

House in Toyonaka, Osakaby FujiwaraMuro Architects - Sheet1
House in Toyonaka ©dezeen.com
House in Toyonaka, Osakaby FujiwaraMuro Architects - Sheet2
House in Toyonaka ©dezeen.com

7. The Feuerle Collection, Berlin by John Pawson

John Pawson transformed a WW2 telecommunication bunker into a contemporary art and furniture museum in Berlin. It is a private museum hosting contemporary art, Imperial Chinese furniture, and Southeast Asian art collections. Pawson took the minimal approach with the visceral experience of mass. 

The Feuerle Collection, Berlin by John Pawson - Sheet1
The Feuerle Collection ©dezeen.com
The Feuerle Collection, Berlin by John Pawson - Sheet2
The Feuerle Collection ©dezeen.com
The Feuerle Collection, Berlin by John Pawson - Sheet3
The Feuerle Collection ©dezeen.com

8. Brexit Bunker, London by Rise Design Studio

Rise Design Studio designed a sunken steel-clad extension in the garden of a London house. The studio faces the main house and is directly behind the railway track, covering the entire exterior of the garden. The studio takes a natural approach with the materials and use of skylight windows for the light. The small space provides a private place to relax amidst the garden.

Brexit Bunker, London by Rise Design Studio - Sheet1
Brexit Bunker ©dezeen.com
Brexit Bunker, London by Rise Design Studio - Sheet2
Brexit Bunker ©dezeen.com
Brexit Bunker, London by Rise Design Studio - Sheet3
Brexit Bunker ©dezeen.com

9. Holiday Home, Netherlands by Studio B-ILD

 Belgian studio B-ILD redesigned a wartime bunker into a tiny vacation home where guests sleep under concrete walls and the home offers comfort in its minimalism. The half-submerged bunker is 9 sq. m with less than 2m head height, hence everything is custom to make optimum use of the space. The design is flexible and adjustable in the middle of the Netherland forest view.

Holiday Home, Netherlands by Studio B-ILD - Sheet1
Holiday Home © dezeen.com
Holiday Home, Netherlands by Studio B-ILD - Sheet2
Holiday Home ©dezeen.com
Holiday Home, Netherlands by Studio B-ILD - Sheet3
Holiday Home ©dezeen.com

10. Hamburg Energie, Germany by IBA Hamburg

IBA Hamburg converted a Second World War bunker in Hamburg into a renewable energy plant and visitor center. The company expanded the 42m high ruined concrete shell with four cylindrical forms that sit at the top. A public cafe that spills out onto the balcony through a glass wall and an event space were also added on the upper level.

Hamburg Energie, Germany by IBA Hamburg - Sheet1
Hamburg Energie ©dezeen.com
Hamburg Energie, Germany by IBA Hamburg - Sheet2
Hamburg Energie ©dezeen.com
Hamburg Energie, Germany by IBA Hamburg - Sheet3
Hamburg Energie ©dezeen.com
Author

Rethinking The Future (RTF) is a Global Platform for Architecture and Design. RTF through more than 100 countries around the world provides an interactive platform of highest standard acknowledging the projects among creative and influential industry professionals.

Write A Comment