Endowed in 2009 and sprouting with a crown of showcased work abroad at London, Milan, and Germany, the earnest enthusiasm of two designers, Sahil Bagga and Sarthak Sengupta, recites the chronicles of the contemporary Indian user through its products. Compiled in a heterogeneous palette of metal, glass, textiles, and pottery, inquisitively crafted using primitive modus operandi like chasing and stamping, this studio reforms craftsmanship to line nests of contemporary spaces, hotels, and high-end homes. 

Knitting together threads of ethics as idea exchange and fair pay, ethnicity as human story and relevance, and rephrasing ecology with bundles of contemporariness, this south Delhi studio incorporates zero kilometer design. Binding tradition with the global meets local approach and a friendly hand touch to graphics and communication, the mixing bag of the studio aligns perfectly with ingenious management of the consumer experience.

1. Interiors: Silver Sand resort, Neil Island

Neil Island, a jewel to the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago, unaware of globalization and still rooted in traditions put forth by the 3000 of its people, demands to preserve its natural ecosystem. Addressing this need to minimize the vegetation clearing, organic and fluid massing evolved its way to accommodate maximum cottages. The architecture of the place, animated from the huts of the traditional Kondul and Jarwa tribes, merges hand painted tribal exteriors with modernized interiors flashing local history relevant products.

Interiors: Silver Sand resort, Neil Island - Sheet1
The furniture – influenced by local boats. ©sahilsarthak.com
Interiors: Silver Sand resort, Neil Island - Sheet2
The use of vernacular material overall. ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Interiors: Silver Sand resort, Neil Island - Sheet3
The coir and palm leaf woven shades throughout the property ©www.sahilsarthak.com

2. Interiors: Lakshman Sagar resort, Raipur:

Raipur in Rajasthan prevails the existing jajmani system in the village to spawn over several skilled artisans who craft their livelihood by their art. The 12 rustic and bohemian, mud, and rock cottages, divided with artificial water channels, stretch over these 35 acres of land and boast local crafts and skills bound with vernacular materials to narrate the core idea for the resort.

Interiors: Lakshman Sagar resort, Raipur: - Sheet1
The fissure dug swimming pool ©www.noblehousetours.com
Interiors: Lakshman Sagar resort, Raipur: - Sheet2
The Bohemian local crafted furniture ©www.tripsavy.com
Interiors: Lakshman Sagar resort, Raipur: - Sheet3
The rustic appearance to the greens and greys adorning the room ©www.noblehousetours.com

3. Installations: The Park Hotel, Kochi:

The 18m high installation in the atrium, amassed with seventy-two, 910mm wide, palm leaf-shaped, and brass coated Kasavu pendants, is energized from Mohiniattam dancer costumes, the pride of Kerala. The eight diversified designs organized in three colors offer a visual treat to its spectators.

Installations: The Park Hotel, Kochi: - Sheet1
The pendant lamps which swing and turn slowly as Mohiniattam dancers do. ©www.sahilsarthak.com

The nettipattam ornaments, usually adorning the temple elephants during festivities, find themselves reinterpreted as five large installations jutting from the front porch.

Installations: The Park Hotel, Kochi: - Sheet2
The lotus flower-inspired lamp installations. ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Installations: The Park Hotel, Kochi: - Sheet3
The nettipattam ornaments as lamps ©www.sahilsarthak.com

4. Interiors: The Lodi garden restaurant, New Delhi:

Lodi Gardens, being the highlight for Delhi and its visitors, demanded to stay true to the roots of a petit garden to maintain its serenity. Thus, while revitalizing the structure, profound design elements exemplifying biomimicry were introduced. Outdoor lights signifying the sharp angular geometry of the honeycomb and the fragility of bird cages adorn the passageways.

Interiors: The Lodi garden restaurant, New Delhi: - Sheet1
 The showstopper – Water sprinkler fountain ©www.sahilsarthak.com  
Interiors: The Lodi garden restaurant, New Delhi: - Sheet2
The lotus leaf-inspired walkway lights ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Interiors: The Lodi garden restaurant, New Delhi: - Sheet3
The basket motived outdoor lights. ©www.sahilsarthak.com

5. Interiors: The Indravan: Indira Gandhi National center for art, New Delhi:

Stationed amid Lutyens Delhi, the rooms herein put glory to the story of the nation and the influences of the narrative milestones in the historical tale of India.

a. The Harappan room:

Ploughing the roots of the Harappan civilization, the grandeur of the past, the olden seal motifs find themselves embellished in lampshades. The crop cultivated economy is a manifest of the grain motifs carpet. Caricaturing shapes of toys in lamps, bullock carts as tables, and worship vessels as bed legs, the Harappan room brings out the glory of the primitive civilization.

The Harappan room: - Sheet1
The Harappan room. ©www.sahilsarthak.com

b. The Mughal room:

Inline geometrical symmetry embodied in golds, silvers, and greens with pieces of broken stained glasses embossed in jali patterns on Lapis Lazuli walls, dominated with a velvet soft furnishing floor is what the Mughal room promises to offer. The silhouette elements from the red fort, the pride of the dynasty, shine securely in bed and chair backs.

The Harappan room: - Sheet2
The Mughal room ©www.sahilsarthak.com

c. The golden age room:

Notifying the onset of the classical ages, where artful prosperity had weightage over function, sipped in cups of yellows, pinks, and peacock blues with gold and bronze plated temple arts, the tale narrators of Panchatantra splash the Indianness on the walls. The life of Kanjeevaram sarees breathes openly on the bind folds as the curves of veena echo on the couch.

The Harappan room: - Sheet3
The Golden age room ©www.sahilsarthak.com

6. Installations: Kalpataru, the wishing tree:

The free-standing showstopper of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, metal framed with brass comprising utensil textures, is known to flourish customs of the festival of lights. The tallest central motif, 3.5m high, often illuminated from below, is the pride of mural work from Keralan artists.

Installations: Kalpataru, the wishing tree: - Sheet1
Kalpataru ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Installations: Kalpataru, the wishing tree: - Sheet2
Kalpataru ©www.sahilsarthak.com

7. Restaurant revamp of Silversand resort, Havelock Island:

Persuaded by colonial architecture, eco-friendly materials and sustainable processes combine themselves with the regional flora and fauna to dip rooms with aquamarine splashes adorned with fish motifs and jellyfish pendant lamps.

Restaurant revamp of Silversand resort, Havelock Island: - Sheet1
Stingray bar stools ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Restaurant revamp of Silversand resort, Havelock Island: - Sheet2
The coral shell lamps ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Restaurant revamp of Silversand resort, Havelock Island: - Sheet3
The aquamarine splashes on walls ©www.sahilsarthak.com

8. Tijara fort hotel, Neemrana hotels, Rajasthan:

With the historical background of a strong fortress, the later converted Tijara fort hotel boasts of serene rusting ruins that demand to be kept undisturbed. Specially tailored lights hover from the ceiling, bringing elegance, rustic and innate beauty. The external form of these lights features the cascading sand-dunes in response to the large bird populations as the bulges cause a hindrance to any bird resting upon it.

Tijara fort hotel, Neemrana hotels, Rajasthan: - Sheet1
The bulging sand dune lights ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Tijara fort hotel, Neemrana hotels, Rajasthan: - Sheet2
The camel inspired pergola motifs ©www.sahilsarthak.com

9. The Social Auto Project:

With an honest attempt to create ambulatory installations, the designed and fabricated auto-rickshaws feature crafts, colors, and graphics of the respective cities they abode in, viz. Coimbatore and Jaipur. Designed as mini food vans or hotel gift shops with the hood replaced by outdoor awning materials, these prime lobby installations aim to boost neighborhood connections. The emblematic elements constructed out of wood, metal, and fabric are either printed on vinyl or hand-drawn with enamel paint.

The Social Auto Project:
The Social Auto Project. ©www.sahilsarthak.com

10. The Katran Collection:

This collection collectively assembles all tiny bits of leftover colorful cloth from the neighborhood mills and knits them back into an ethnic modern-day lifestyle product. Available in various colors and textures, this one-of-a-kind, “glocal” that is a global and local handcrafted piece is unique in its sense as the same combination and flow can never repeat for another. Currently featuring at Ambiente Fair Frankfurt, 2012, and Triennale design museum, Milan, this product is the eyecatcher of many residences and resorts.

The Katran Collection: - Sheet1
The Katran collection ©www.sahilsarthak.com
The Katran Collection: - Sheet2
The Katran collection ©www.sahilsarthak.com
The Katran Collection: - Sheet3
The Katran collection ©www.sahilsarthak.com
The Katran Collection: - Sheet4
 The Katran collection ©www.sahilsarthak.com
Ruchika Deshpande
Author

An architecture student by profession, a curious empath by choice, Ruchika’s perceptive hearing has always unfolded the esoteric and stupendous tales of folklore and tradition in architecture. With a piercing interest in art, history and architecture, she holds strong to her poetic conclusions whilst analyzing human perception of the same.

Write A Comment