Milton Maltz, founder of the Marlite Company, aimed at bringing to light the tradecraft, history, and contemporary role of espionage. This founded the creation of the INTERNATIONAL SPY MUSEUM, in Washington D.C, the only public museum in the world that provides a global perspective on the profession of espionage. The privately-owned Museum, originally located in a 19th-century building in Penn Quarter, opened to the public in 2002 and relocated to the new building in 2019.

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‘Being hidden’ or ‘Hiding in plain sight’, two techniques of espionage, were the guiding principles for the design of the International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners (RSH+P). Depending upon the visitors’ angle of approach, the building either announces itself boldly with its angled red-colored steel supports or hides behind an unassuming party wall in the L’Enfant Plaza.

The new building had to address the contextual complexity of creating a landmark building that will re-energize the Plaza while being a stepping stone from the National Mall to Washington DC’s southwest waterfront. The composition and materiality of the new museum deliberately contrasted the monotone heavy buildings of its surroundings with its lightweight steel structure. To reach outwards into the 10th street, while being constrained by the parking garage beneath, the museum’s primary façade was propped back to this structural grid which gave the building its distinct leaning façade.

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International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners- Building of Secrets - sheet1
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com
International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners- Building of Secrets - sheet2
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com
International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners- Building of Secrets - sheet3
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com
International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners - sheet5
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com
International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners - sheet6
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com
International Spy Museum by Rogers Stirk Harbour +Partners - sheet7
International Spy Museum ©www.rsh-p.com

Spatial Planning

The most prominent features of this seven-storeyed, 130ft tall building, are its angled facades of the exhibit floors which are encased in a black box. This black box with its exhibition spaces, propped up on bright red colored columns comprises the bulk of the building. Its prominent façade angles out towards the street, creating a sheltered public space to one side.

The double-height space at the ground level houses the lobby and retail facilities, with the educational space for student and teacher workshops within the mezzanine floor. The museum’s three main exhibition areas featuring the ‘Special Exhibition’s floor, the theatre, permanent exhibition, and task-finding, the future ‘Operation Spy’ space, within floor heights up to 20ft, are above the ground floor lobby.

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These two floors are connected by a metal staircase suspended along the outside of the metal-paneled façade, enclosed in a suspended glass atrium. Above the exhibition floors are the office spaces and floating above these is a white box housing the events space and crowned with a large rooftop terrace. The events box, with its steel structure, provides the museum with its 60-ft spans with full height windows arranged in a 180-degree span around the building. These facilitate a platform for observing the Capitol and the Washington Monument, the National Cathedral and the Basilica, the District Wharf, and National Harbour.

Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet7
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet8
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet9
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet10
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet11
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet12
International Spy Museum ©ww.archdaily.com

Overall Museum Design Techniques

The Museum aims at uncovering some of the less clandestine aspects of spycraft as well as those that are more covert. The permanent collection covers the complete history of espionage with more than 750 artifacts on public display, supported with historic photographs, interactive displays, films, and videos. These ideas reveal themselves in the spatial planning of the 120,000 sq. ft. building accommodating a 145-seat theatre, rooftop terrace, and top-floor event space.

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The main 10th Street façade displays varying degrees of transparency and opacity drawing to mind the overarching narrative of concealment and hiding in plain sight. The design creates a series of layers that either allude to a secretive activity that occurs within the building or places that activity on the street to display. Folded Aluminium rain screens, which catch different shades of light during the day, constitute the ‘black box’ façade, giving the box an articulated appearance. Perforations on the underside of this façade give visitors a glimpse downward from the interior to the street, while at night, due to back-lighting, it hints at something special that is happening inside the museum.

Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet13
International Spy Museum ©washington.org
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet14
International Spy Museum ©washington.org
Museum of Science and Industry by D.H. Burnham & Co- The Palace of Fine Arts The largest science museum in the western hemisphere, Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry is home to more than 400000 square feet of exhibits that encourage curiosity and help develop scientific temper. Prominent exhibits include a full-sized replica of a coal mine, German submarine U-505 which was captured during WW2, 3500 square foot model railroad, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless steel passenger train, Pioneer Zephyr. It attracts nearly two million visitors every year. Image Sources: Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago ©️ MSI Chicago In 1893, the city of Chicago, Illinois played host to the World's Columbian Exposition, a world’s fair celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the “New World”. It was a turning point for Chicago’s history and helped cement its position as a center of culture and commerce. The building that houses the Museum of Science and Industry was previously home to the Palace of Fine Arts from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Palace of Fine Arts (1893), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons Built-in true Beaux-Arts style, The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building constructed as a part of exposition’s chief architect Daniel Burnham’s “White City” that remains. Designed by Charles Atwood under Burnham’s direction, it features a typical neoclassical façade – perfectly symmetrical with classical ornamentation such as ionic columns, garlands and caryatids, and white plastering. Unlike the other White City buildings, The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed with a brick substructure to be fireproof to ensure protection for the priceless works of arts it carried. Till 1920 the building served as the home of the Field Museum of Natural History and was suffering from disintegration due to neglect. It was rebuilt of more-permanent materials from 1928 to 1932, especially the exterior which was recast in limestone to retain its Beaux-arts style. The museum was opened to the public during the city’s Century of Progress Exposition (1933–34). The interiors of the building were remodeled in 1933 in the Art Moderne style under the direction of architect Alfred Shaw. Image Sources: 1. Museum of Science and Industry ©️ www.architecture.org 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.architecture.org The Museum of Science and Industry is arranged in the form of a cross with a dome rising above its center. The main structure covers an area of 320 feet by 500 feet. It is intersected by a nave with a transept one hundred feet wide and seventy feet high, and a central dome sixty feet wide and one hundred feet high surmounted by a winged figure of Victory. It is surrounded by a gallery forty feet wide. The building is divided into four great courts known as the north, south, east, and west court. These courts lead into the building's grand central dome. In connection with the main structure are two pavilions or annexes 120 by 200 feet in dimensions, which are also used to display exhibits. An exterior colonnade extends from each pavilion to the north and south courts of the main building. Image Sources: 1. Palace of Fine Arts (Floor Plan), Chicago ©️ Wikimedia Commons 2. Museum of Science and Industry; Chicago ©️ www.choosechicago.com Today the museum features over 35000 artifacts and exhibits spread over 400000 square feet of exhibition space. It features an 800 seat auditorium and Chicago’s only 5 stored domed movie theatres. On each of the three levels of the museum, one can explore the various permanent and temporary exhibits. Upon entering the museum one is greeted by the Pioneer Zephyr train exhibit in the Entry Hall. It was the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel train. Image Sources: 1. Entry Hall ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Pioneer Zephyr ©️ MSI, Chicago The Lower level exhibits include U-505 – a German submarine captured during WW2, model ships, farming technology, and equipment and the Apollo 8 spacecraft, which is housed in the Henry Crown Space Centre which is Chicago’s only domed theatre. Image Sources: 1. Lower Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. U-505 Submarine ©️ MSI, Chicago The main level is host to exhibits such as a mirror maze, Transportation Gallery, Coal mine replica, and Yesterday's Mainstreet, a mock-up of a Chicago street from the early 20th century. Image Sources: 1. Level 1 ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. Mirror Maze ©️35 MSI, Chicago The second or balcony level consists of exhibits of fighter jets and model navy warships, and a walkthrough model of the human heart. Image Sources: 1. Balcony Level ©️ MSI, Chicago 2. YOU! Heart models ©️ MSI, Chicago The building strikes a balance between the old and new, and past and present. It provides a rare insight into the architecture of the Fair and yet has been adopted as one of the top cultural institutions in Chicago. - Sheet15
International Spy Museum ©washington.org

Circulation

Visitors arrive at the top of the black box, at the exhibition level, by an elevator, then circulate back down to Street. The special exhibition space and theatre at the lowermost level of the black box can also be the lobby and retail space on the ground floor via a monumental suspended stair that overlooks the 10th accessed by this stair, which provides for flexibility and independent entry.

Eduwik- Online Courses for Architects & Designers

The stair is encased in a pleated glass ‘veil’ façade. To create varying degrees of transparency, the form of this veil was tessellated which breaks up reflections. This was accentuated by a fritted pattern added to the southwest facing panels that aid in reducing glare and solar gain.

The stair within the veil, provides animation to the main 10th Street frontage, allowing visitors to orient themselves to take in views over Washington, a city with one of the greatest concentrations of spies in the world.

This 130,000-square-foot tall glass-and-steel museum provides different floors to generate activities and interest within the neighborhood, giving the visitors an opportunity to study and learn more than they can ever imagine.

Eduwik- Online Courses for Architects & Designers
Author

An architect from Kerala, who best expresses her feelings through doodles and words, Naomi is still in a self-discovering journey, be it through music, traveling, or volunteering. Her positive attitude towards life motivates her to make the world a better place to live in, one step at a time.

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