“Our first objective was to individualise the space …with a quiet opulence.”

OKHA’s latest interior project, Clifton 301, is a seasonal two-bedroom apartment in a sophisticated contemporary complex designed by SAOTA. Flanked on either side by Table Mountain’s legendary Twelve Apostles, it looks out over breath-taking panoramic views of the Cape Atlantic Ocean and is in equal parts luxurious getaway, relaxed coastal retreat and entertainer’s dream.

Project Name: Clifton 301
Architect Name: OKHA

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The architects designed the complex with deliberately pared-down, monochromatic interior shells. Not only was OKHA responsible for the interior decoration, but also designed key items of bespoke handmade furniture throughout the apartment.

“Our first objective was to individualise the space by modulating the internal colour palette,” says

OKHA director Adam Court. He and the OKHA team set about customising the apartment’s interiors to create a cool and restful space in contrast to the bright, sunlit exterior.
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“We used subtle shades of green with delicate natural tonalities that reference the local landscape,” says Court. Table Mountain’s famous granite, fynbos and dappled woods are evoked throughout the apartment in a rich, raw palette of natural timbers, stones and metals, which are contrasted with plush velvets and linens on the walls, floors and furniture coverings, resulting in what Court refers to as a contemporary “quiet opulence”.

“These shades are repeated in the furniture with a strong emphasis on textures and materials,” he adds. When it came to designing the custom furniture pieces, Court says, “The designs are pared-back and lean focussing on strong forms and shapes that communicate simply and directly.”

“All the artwork accessories and objects are from Cape-based artisans and add an

essential level of layering and local character,” he adds.

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Dream Emperor Marble and Absolute Black Granite tabletops are paired with steel bases in the side, coffee and balcony tables. The dining table, barstools and server are hewn from carbon-stained wire brushed Ash timber, also used in the frame of signature OKHA “Port” mirror, which, with its copper framed recessed mirror carries a nautical tone of a ship’s circular windows.

Clifton 301 Building By SAOTA + OKHA - Sheet11The palette is intentionally and carefully controlled and restrained to embrace the

everchanging colours of the sunrise and sunset, which are the real centrepiece and art

show.” – Adam Court

The client, a New York based businessman who gave OKHA complete carte blanche says, “Cape

Town is the perfect mix of stunning nature, great outdoor activities, a world-renowned design and art scene, top tier restaurants and winelands, providing an unrivalled value for money when compared to other global destinations. Cape Town attracts diverse, talented, creative and professional people to its shores, the foundation of what makes Cape Town so attractive to live in.”

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“The panoramic exterior allows you to feel as though you are hovering right above the water’s surface.” – Adam Court

“Thought leaders and globally respected in their field, their intimate knowledge of both

local and global materials, artisans, and design trends always leads to a perfect blend.”


OKHA

OKHA is a small batch producer of bespoke furniture, lighting and objet d’art.
Creative Director and designer, Adam Court has a background in fine art and has worked in a broad range of creative formats across many genres; including film, fashion and photography. With his explorative, forward-thinking and intuitive approach to design, unconstrained by formal training, he has developed the brand into the prominent South African design label it is today.

With its headquarters in Cape Town, a city with an artisanal history and unrivalled beauty, OKHA has a design ethos which makes each piece both furniture and design statement. “It is no longer good enough to create luxury for luxury’s sake,” says Court. “Luxury must go beyond consumerism, finding its basis in the integrity of the design and truth to materials. Design is an art where both personal expression, form and function can merge and should endure”.

OKHA prefers organic materials that have inherent value and character which only improve over time.

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