Pavilions in architecture refer to the sub-structures within the premises of a building complex generally built as a pleasure space – for exhibitions and galleries, for capturing good views, being used in gardens for leisure, and so on. Pavilions are either temporary structures or permanent structures. With time, pavilions have undergone transition. From being visualized only in palatial mansions, pavilions have become a part of urban living – serving as a social puncture in the dense urban fabric. 

Pavilions and temporary structures have a striking relevance in society today. They help shape the public spaces and bear an impact on the minds of the citizens. In recent times, designers and architects have used pavilions and temporary structures in cities to throw light on critical issues of public concern. 

Temporary structures have also served as the go-to solution during emergencies like the infamous 2020 pandemic. The rapid increase in Covid-19 cases in March 2020 led various countries to create temporary structures to accommodate the growing number of patients. The efficiency of these temporary structures enabled the countries to tackle the problem smartly. 

Following are ten examples of temporary structures and pavilions that showcase the diversity in their intent and usage while experimenting with materials, forms, and colors.  

1. Bookworm Pavilion – Mumbai

Designed by – NUDES

About 3,600 modular components were fabricated to put this ‘gliding bookworm’ together. As the name suggests, the pavilion was conceptualized to encourage reading amongst youngsters and adults alike. The modular components use recycled plywood that has a low carbon footprint. 

Bookworm Pavilion - Mumbai - Sheet1
Bookworm Pavilion ©Sameer Chawda
Bookworm Pavilion - Mumbai - Sheet2
Bookworm Pavilion ©Sameer Chawda
Bookworm Pavilion - Mumbai - Sheet3
Bookworm Pavilion ©Sameer Chawda

2. Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions – Italy

Designed by – Stefano Boeri Architects

Stefano Boeri Architects have designed circular glowing boxes to be installed at about 1,500 Piazzas in Italy to serve as Covid-19 vaccination camps. These fully-recyclable circular pavilions can be completely dismantled and relocated. 

Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions - Italy - Sheet1
Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions ©Stefano Boeri Architects
Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions - Italy - Sheet2
Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions ©Stefano Boeri Architects
Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions - Italy - Sheet3
Prefabricated Vaccination Pavilions ©Stefano Boeri Architects

3. Sarbalé Ke – Indio

Designed by – Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture

12 colorful towers varying in height and diameter, scattered around to facilitate spaces for meeting, resting, and the guiding landmarks in the lively festival of Coachella, 2019. It was named ‘Sarbalé Ke’ that translates to ‘House of Celebration’. The installation added a pop of color to the existing pomp of the festival. 

Sarbalé Ke - Indio - Sheet1
Sarbalé Ke – Indio ©Iwan Baan
Sarbalé Ke - Indio - Sheet2
Sarbalé Ke – Indio ©Lance Gerber
Sarbalé Ke - Indio - Sheet3
Sarbalé Ke – Indio ©Lance Gerber

4. Poem Pavilion – Expo 2020, Dubai

Designed by – Es Devlin

Expo 2020, Dubai (now moved to October 2021 due to Covid-19) will see this massive conical pavilion shooting out off the ground. The cone-like structure will be made of communicative LED panels which will use Artificial Intelligence to generate and display poems. ‘Message to space’ – an idea derived from one of Stephen Hawking’s final projects, ‘breakthrough message’ forms the basis of the concept.

Poem Pavilion - Expo 2020, Dubai - Sheet1
Poem Pavilion © Es Devlin
Poem Pavilion - Expo 2020, Dubai - Sheet2
Poem Pavilion © Es Devlin
Poem Pavilion - Expo 2020, Dubai - Sheet3
Poem Pavilion © Es Devlin

5. Circular Garden Pavilion – Porto

Designed by – Diogo Aguiar Studio

Two concentric wooden circles formed the pavilion in a cultural institution designed by Álvaro Siza in the city. The curvilinear façades control the incoming natural light and aid in keeping the interior dark enough to host film screenings. 

Circular Garden Pavilion - Porto - Sheet1
Circular Garden Pavilion ©Fernando Guerra
Circular Garden Pavilion - Porto - Sheet2
Circular Garden Pavilion ©Fernando Guerra
Circular Garden Pavilion - Porto - Sheet3
Circular Garden Pavilion ©Francisco Nogueira
Circular Garden Pavilion - Porto - Sheet4
Circular Garden Pavilion ©Fernando Guerra

6. Green Cloud – China

Designed by – ZHUBO-AAO

A system of modular cubes is fixed together in a random fashion installed atop roofs of residences in dense urban areas to revive greenery in the ever-growing Chinese cities. Easy installation of these modules will lead to rapid copying and an increase in the green and comfortable spaces for residents. 

Green Cloud - China - Sheet1
Green Cloud © John Siu
Green Cloud - China - Sheet2
Green Cloud © John Siu
Green Cloud - China - Sheet3
Green Cloud © ZHUBO-AAO
Green Cloud - China - Sheet4
Green Cloud © ZHUBO-AAO

7. Second Home Serpentine Pavilion – Los Angeles

Designed by – SelgasCano 

This brightly illuminated tunnel-like pavilion gives visitors a one-of-a-kind experience in architecture through shape, form, light, transparency, and materials. The pavilion was originally erected in 2015 in London’s Kensington Gardens and then relocated to L.A.’s La Brea Tar Pits. The temporary structure resembles a chrysalis clad in translucent, multicolored fabric.

Second Home Serpentine Pavilion - Los Angeles -Sheet1
Second Home Serpentine Pavilion © Iwan Baan
Second Home Serpentine Pavilion - Los Angeles -Sheet2
Second Home Serpentine Pavilion © Iwan Baan
Second Home Serpentine Pavilion © Iwan Baan

8. Upcycled Pavilion – Mexico 

Designed by – BNKR Arquitectura 

The Upcycled Pavilion was a temporary structure constructed for Expo CIHAC – 2012. The whole installation was done on-site with around 5000 Coca-Cola crates to spread awareness about upcycling and to demonstrate how good design can come out of waste and less money, or in this case, no money at all. 

This pavilion was used in the expo to serve as a cafeteria. The crates were used to create elegant curves that gave the structure fluidity despite using a rigid shape for the modules. 

Upcycled Pavilion - Mexico - Sheet1
Upcycled Pavilion ©Sebastián Suárez
Upcycled Pavilion - Mexico - Sheet2
Upcycled Pavilion ©Sebastián Suárez
Upcycled Pavilion ©Sebastián Suárez

9. Biobasecamp Pavilion – Eindhoven

Designed by – Studio Marco Vermeulen

A timber structure was built to demonstrate the structural possibilities of the material in an attempt to urge more sustainable construction. The pavilion acts as an interactive space for the citizens as it invites visitors to the exhibition on the ground level or to climb up to the roof level for taking a breather within their busy schedules. 

The structure is built with cross-laminated timber (CLT) and is said to lower CO2 and nitrogen amounts in the air to work against the dooming climate change. 

Biobasecamp Pavilion - Eindhoven - Sheet1
Biobasecamp Pavilion © Ronald Tilleman
Biobasecamp Pavilion - Eindhoven - Sheet2
Biobasecamp Pavilion © Ronald Tilleman
Biobasecamp Pavilion - Eindhoven - Sheet3
Biobasecamp Pavilion © Ronald Tilleman

10. Serpentine Pavilion 2018 – London

Designed by – Frida Escobedo

Frida’s Serpentine Pavilion in 2018 was a structure fabricated from a lattice of cement roof tiles. The said material was chosen for its dark color and jagged texture. The cement roof tiled structure forms a breeze wall generic in Mexican architecture. This surface “blurs the surrounding park and the Serpentine Gallery.” 

The pavilion with its irregular shapes and forms was meant to encourage play, circulation, conversation, and contemplation. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2018 - London - Sheet1
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 © Frida Escobedo
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 - London - Sheet2
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 © Designboom
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 - London - Sheet3
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 © Designboom
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 - London - Sheet4
Serpentine Pavilion 2018 © Designboom
Sharadhi Katti
Author

Into all things creative, Sharadhi channelizes her emotions through her art – design, writing, painting, and cooking. Being an architect by profession, she is intrigued by ‘attention to details’ and seeks perfection. Experimental yet a conformist. In the quest of finding her purpose.

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