Architecture operated within society as a type of literal narrative. A story in architecture can carry wealth and profundity to a venture, and there are unexplored ways that account to be utilized in the plan procedure. Projects based on narrative other than the conventional program based approach can offer another working strategy for design. Using narrative as a template for the design process allows the foundation of a design to be deep and anchored in history creating a new lens through which to see storytelling in architecture and providing a dynamic spatial experience as a story to its user.

1. Jewish Museum, Berlin | Daniel Libeskind

The extension to the Jewish Museum was about establishing and securing an identity within Berlin, which was lost during WWII. Reasonably the exhibition hall was intended to communicate sentiments of nonappearance, void, and intangibility – articulations of the vanishing of the Jewish Culture. It was the demonstration of utilizing design as a method of narrative and emotion, giving visitors an encounter of the impacts of the Holocaust on both the Jewish culture and the city of Berlin. The undertaking starts to take its structure from a preoccupied Jewish Star of David that is extended around the site and its specific circumstance. The form is established through a process of connecting lines between locations of historical events that provide structure for the building resulting in a literal extrusion of those lines into a “zig-zag” building form.

Jewish Museum, Berlin | Daniel Libeskind - Sheet1
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2. Steilneset Memorial, Norway | Peter Zumthor

In memory of those aggrieved in the seventeenth-century Finnmark Witchcraft Trials, the Steilneset Memorial rests along the spiked coastline of the Barents Sea in Vardo Norway. Zumthor portrays venture as a point and as a line. The line belongs to the architect while the dot belongs to the artist Louise bourgeois, a collaboration of ideas. According to him, the art installation talks about burning and aggression, and the building is about feelings about life and emotions.

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3. VitraHaus, Weil Am Rhein, Germany | Herzog, and de Meuron

The VitraHaus combines the idea from two different structures, the Vitra Design Museum by Frank Gehry (1989) and the Conference Pavilion by Tadao Ando (1993). The idea of the VitraHaus associates two subjects that show up more than once in the oeuvre of Herzog and de Meuron: the theme of the archetypal house and the theme of stacked volumes. Since the primary purpose of the five-story building is to present furnishings and objects for the home. Because of the extents and measurements of the inside spaces – the architect utilizes the term ‘local scale’ – the showrooms are suggestive of natural private settings. The individual ‘houses’, which have the general qualities of a showcase space, are considered as theoretical components.

VitraHaus, Weil Am Rhein, Germany | Herzog, and de Meuron - Sheet1
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4. Bait Ur Rouf Mosque, Bangladesh | Marina Tabassum

The Land was donated by a client and through community fundraising, the project came to completion. Situated in an undeniably thick neighborhood of Dhaka, the Mosque was raised on a plinth on a site hub making a 13-degree edge with the qibla course, which called for advancement in the design. A barrel-shaped volume was embedded into a square, facilitating a rotation of the prayer hall, and framing light courts on four sides. The lobby is a space raised on eight fringe sections. Auxiliary capacities are situated in spaces made by the external square and the chamber. Subsidized and utilized by local people, and propelled by the Sultanate mosque design, it inhales through permeable block dividers, keeping the supplication lobby ventilated and cool. Characteristic light acquired through a bay window is adequate for the daytime.

Bait Ur Rouf Mosque, Bangladesh | Marina Tabassum - Sheet1
Bait Ur Rouf Mosque ©architectmagzine.com
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Bait Ur Rouf Mosque ©architectmagzine.com
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Bait Ur Rouf Mosque ©architectmagzine.com

5. Parc de La Villette, Paris, France | Bernard Tschumi

Parc de la Villette was not intended to be a beautiful park suggestive of hundreds of years past; it was a greater amount of an open spread that was intended to be explored and found by those that visited the site. Tschumi, needed the recreation center to be a space for movement and connection that would bring out a feeling of opportunity inside a superimposed association that would give the visitors perspectives. As a major aspect of Tschumi’s general goal to instigate investigation, development, and connection, he dissipated 10 themed cultivates all through the huge extensive site that individuals would unearth either truly or vaguely. Each themed garden allows visitors to unwind, reflect, and even play. Parc de la Villette is structured with three standards of association which Tschumi arranges as points, lines, and surfaces. The 135 section of the land site is sorted out spatially through a framework of 35 points, or the architect calls as follis. The arrangement of follis gives a dimensional and authoritative quality to the recreation center filling in as perspectives. The repetitive nature of each folly, even though each one is unique and different, consider the visitors to hold a feeling of spotting through the enormous park.

Parc de La Villette, Paris, France | Bernard Tschumi - Sheet1
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6. The Therme Vals, Switzerland | Peter Zumthor

“Mountain, stone, water – working in the stone, working with the stone, into the mountain, working out of the mountain, being inside the mountain – in what capacity can the suggestions and the arousing quality of the relationship of these words be deciphered, compositionally?” Peter Zumthor This space was intended for visitors to thrive and rediscover the antiquated advantages to a bath. The blends of light and shade, open and enclosed spaces, and direct components make for a profoundly exotic and remedial experience. The underlying informal layout of the internal space is a carefully modeled path of circulation which leads bathers to certain predetermined points but lets them explore other areas for themselves. The viewpoint is constantly controlled. It either guarantees or denies a view.

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Therme Vals, Switzerland ©archdaily.com

7. Villa Muller, Prague, Czech Republic | Adolf Loos

The essential type of the manor is a straightforward shape: its exteriors are astounding in the grimness of the enormous continuous territories of smooth dividers with abnormally small windows. This somber façade treatment is commonplace of Loos’ work. As much as on account of the estate for Dr. Müller, this building affirms Loos’ conviction that a structure ought not to be worked for the passers-by, however for its inhabitants or clients. The Villa Muller permitted Adolf Loos’s degree to make a definitive type of his unique idea of the room, the Raumplan, in light of the sensational arranging of various height levels for different rooms dependent on their capacity and emblematic significance, all formed around a focal flight of stairs. It makes conceivable both the common visual association of house-spaces and a round of spatial experiences, as well as the maximum use of the interior space of the residence. Rooms are linked through steps at different levels.

Villa Muller, Prague, Czech Republic | Adolf Loos - Sheet1
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Villa Muller ©adolfloos.cz
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Villa Muller ©adolfloos.cz

8. Imperial War Museum, Manchester, UK | Daniel Libeskind

A style of postmodern design portrayed by discontinuity and contortion. The plan idea is that of a globe that has been broken into parts and afterward reassembled. The three sections interlock and join at various edges, each speaking to an alternate component, earth, air, and water. These three shards speak to clashes that have been battled by people via land, sky, and ocean. The Earth shard frames the gallery space, meaning the open, natural domain of contention and war. The Air shard fills in as a sensational section with anticipated pictures, observatories, and instruction spaces demonstrating an increasingly elusive and enthusiastic side to war. At long last, the Water shard frames the stage for surveying the Canal, with an eatery, bistro, deck, and execution space.

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Imperial War Museum North, Manchester ©libeskind.com
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Imperial War Museum North, Manchester ©libeskind.com

9. Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland | Steven Holl

The very idea of a workmanship exhibition infers an internal core interest. While the need to grandstand the social fortunes contained inside is undeniable, the need to interface these shielded show spaces to the outside world is less and they are now and again ignored completely. Even monumental design that turns the museum itself into a sculptural element may fail to refer to its particular surroundings. This feeling of ‘placelessness’ is the thing that Steven Holl tried to maintain a strategic distance. The Kiasma Museum is orchestrated with outward views and formally irregular gallery spaces.

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Kiasma Museum of Contemporary art ©archdaily.com

10. Casa Barragan, Cuerámaro, Mexico | Luis Barragan

The Emphasis on shading structure and surface characterize the account of villa Barragan. The most noticeable angles are the utilization of level planes and light, both characteristic and counterfeit. The lookout windows and windows bring in light throughout the day; the surges of normal light and perspectives on nature are the key motivations behind the windows. Opening up into the nursery, the rear of the house makes a noticeable and physical connection between the lower level and the patio.

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References

ArchDaily. AD Classics: AD Classics: Casa Barragan / Luis Barragan. [online] Available at: https://www.www.archdaily.com/102599/ad-classics-casa-barragan-luis-barragan

ArchDaily.  AD Classics: Kiasma Museum Of Contemporary Art / Steven Holl Architects. [online] Available at: https://www.www.archdaily.com/784993/ad-classics-kiasma-museum-of-contemporary-art-steven-holl-architects

Allen, E., 2016, 14 Forward Thinking Buildings By Daniel Libeskind. [online] Architectural Digest. Available at: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/gallery/daniel-libeskind-architecture

Adolf Loos. The Villa Müller. [online] Available at: https://adolfloos.cz/en/villa-muller

Lecuyer, Annette. “Art Museum, Steven Holl Architects.” Architectural Review, August 1998. http://www.architectural-review.com/buildings/1998-august-art-museum-steven-holl-architects-helsinki-finland/8618907.fullarticle.

Akdn.org. Bait Ur Rouf Mosque | Aga Khan Development Network. [online] Available at: https://www.akdn.org/architecture/project/bait-ur-rouf-mosque

ArchDaily. Peter Zumthor Works. [online] Available at: https://www.www.archdaily.com/19403/peter-zumthor-works

Yash Siroliya
Author

Yash Siroliya is a Masters in Urban Design student at the Planning Department in CEPT. In an award winning bachelor's thesis, Yash focused on the restoration of the artistic and cultural legacy of a Himachal village. These days he spends his time thinking about public spaces for the next billion.

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